An historical and descriptive guide to Leamington Spa: with a brief account of Warwick, Kenilworth, Guy's Cliff, Grove Park, Stoneleigh, Baginton, Offchurch, &c

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1827 - Leamington (England) - 58 pages
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Page 39 - Stranger, to whom this monument is shown, Invoke the poet's curse upon Malone ; Whose meddling zeal his barbarous taste betrays, And daubs his tombstone, as he mars his plays.
Page 34 - The eyes were of a light hazel, and the hair and beard auburn. The dress consisted of a scarlet doublet, over which was a loose black gown without sleeves. The lower part of the cushion before him was of a crimson colour, and the upper part green, with gilt tassels.
Page 52 - ... close to the water, and is called the Great House ; it was formerly a residence of the family of Fielding, having been inhabited by them in the 16th century, perhaps much earlier, This house seems to have suffered an hostile attack : tradition says it was battered by the soldiers...
Page 9 - ... cases, tobacco-stoppers, and numerous other articles. Nor did New Place long escape the destructive hand of Mr. Gastrell, who, being compelled to pay the monthly assessments...
Page 40 - Avgvst 1649, in ye armes of him, who most entirely loved and was beloved of her even to ye very death.
Page 33 - Stanton) and we may conclude, without much hesitation, that the artist was employed by Dr. Hall and his wife, and that the resemblance was as faithful as a bust, not modelled from the life...
Page 28 - Hee woold not strive to get excessive gaine In ani cloath or other kinde of thinge : His servant SI this trueth can testifie A witness that beheld it with mi eie.
Page 12 - Come hither, little Recorder. It was told me that youe wold be afraid to look upon me, or to speak boldly ; but 1 This was, most probably, in 1565, when she visited Coventry and Kenilworth.
Page 9 - ... tobacco-stoppers, and numerous other articles. Nor did New Place long escape the destructive hand of Mr. Gastrell, who, being compelled to pay the monthly assessments towards the maintenance of the poor, some of which he expected to avoid because he resided part of the year at Lichfield, though his servants continued in the house at Stratford during his absence; — in the heat of his anger declared, that house should never be assessed again ; and to give his imprecation due effect, and wishing...

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