The Unknown American Revolution: The Unruly Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America

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Penguin, May 30, 2006 - History - 544 pages
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In this audacious recasting of the American Revolution, distinguished historian Gary Nash offers a profound new way of thinking about the struggle to create this country, introducing readers to a coalition of patriots from all classes and races of American society. From millennialist preachers to enslaved Africans, disgruntled women to aggrieved Indians, the people so vividly portrayed in this book did not all agree or succeed, but during the exhilarating and messy years of this country's birth, they laid down ideas that have become part of our inheritance and ideals toward which we still strive today.
 

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User Review  - PamelaDLloyd - LibraryThing

I'm learning a lot about the revolutionary activities that led up to the American Revolution. The stuff we learned in school was so tame compared to much of what this book covers. Read full review

THE UNKNOWN AMERICAN REVOLUTION: The Unruly Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

The American Revolution, writes Nash (History/UCLA; History on Trial, 1997), was messy, deadly, and radical through and through—far from the sanitized, mythical version of the textbooks.Call this an ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
xiii
ROOTS OF RADICALISM
1
YEARS OF INSURGENCE 17611766
44
BUILDING MOMENTUM 17661774
88
REACHING THE CLIMAX 17741776
150
THE DUAL REVOLUTION 17761778
207
WRITING ON THE CLEAN SLATE 17761780
264
RADICALISM AT FLOODTIDE 17781781
306
TAMING THE REVOLUTION 17801785
366
SPARKS FROM THE ALTAR OF 76
423
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About the author (2006)

Gary B. Nash is professor of history at UCLA and director of the National Center for History in the Schools. He is the former president of the Organization of American Historians, co-chair of the National History Standards Project, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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