Report on Dredging in Lake St. Peter: And on the Improvement of the River St. Lawrence, Between Montreal and Quebec, (with Charts)

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Page 7 - This would have avoided both the Upper Bar and the Flats, and have shortened the route through the Lake nearly one mile. After working until September, 1847, when £73,955 had been expended for outfit and operations, in removing what now appears to have been less than 350,000 cubic yards, measured in excavation, the scheme was abandoned. In 1850, the two dredges were transferred to the Harbour Commissioners of Montreal, who commenced operations in the following year, in the "old...
Page 17 - Bell, on assuming the charge of operations in the lake, is that known as " radius cutting," as distinguished from the ordinary or " trench cutting," method. The dredge is moored on chains leading from the bow and stern in the direction of the channel, and also by four chains at right angles to the channel, one out from each quarter of the vessel. In this position, she may be compared to a turtle, chained by the head, tail, and the four legs, and floating over the channel to be cut. Instead of cutting...
Page 27 - ... years therefrom vessels of three hundred and four hundred tons, drawing twelve and thirteen feet water, were numerous in the harbour, although they could not pass the river in neap tides. The number of vessels had increased threefold, their tonnage fivefold, and the revenues had increased fivefold, amounting to upwards of £40,000 per annum, In 1840, therefore, an Act was obtained defining bold lines of river and harbour improvement, and for deepening to seventeen feet at neap tides. - In 1846...
Page 13 - DREDGING. On comparing the operations and expenditure of the Board of "Works in the four seasons from 1844 to 1847 inclusive, with those of the Harbour Commissioners in the four seasons from 1851 to 1854, we cannot fail to be struck with the difference in the cost of dredging per cubic yard, as much as with the immediate and beneficial results to the trade, arising from the latter management. While much is no doubt to be ascribed to the selection of the old channel by the Harbour Commissioners, it...
Page 20 - ... excavation, removed for an outlay of £74,000, (including the full value of outfit), or nearly thirteen pence per cubic yard. The cost exclusive of outfit is £42,300, or about seven pence per cubic yard. A similar measurement and calculation, applied to the straight or Board of Works channel, show the present result of the operations there to have been attained at a cost per cubic yard four times greater than that in the old. In the four full months of 1854, July, August, September and October,...
Page 27 - Previous to this the monies necessary to carry en the work had been advanced by the Town of Glasgow, but at this time had all been repaid out of the trust revenues. In 1824, when the first steam dredging machine was set at work, the River had been deepened to eleven and a half feet, the revenues had reached £8500, the size of the ships was increasing, and Glasgow owned one hundred and eleven vessels, amounting to 14,000 tons.
Page 26 - ... the commencement of the dredges in 1824, chiefly by the scour of the tide, aided by dykes and jetties. Of the remaining 4,000,000, about 3,500,000 have been removed since 1840, at an average cost of about thirteen pence sterling per cubic yard. The annual expenditure for dredging, since 1840, average about £15,000 sterling — the sum of £212,537 sterling having been expended for this purpose since that date. The depth secured is twelve feet at low and eighteen feet at high water, and the width...
Page 16 - ... measured half a mile less, (in a distance of six and a-half miles,) on the ice than on the charts. A similar miscalculation may have been made in estimating the Board of Works channel ; but this would only account for a portion of the discrepancy. If we deduct the whole of the outfit, (making no change for depreciation,) it would still appear that about £33,500 were expended " in operations " in the new channel. Taking the present measurement of 332,044 cubic yards, and setting off any work...
Page 11 - ... beacons, was really the best that could be obtained. It will be apparent that, so long as the flats of Lake St. Peter were the guage of the draught of vessels ascending the St. Lawrence between Quebec and Montreal, no vessel drawing more than eleven feet at low water had ever navigated the river above the the lake. The channel known to the pilots, therefore, had never been tested for any increased draught, and 'as soon as this was done, (in consequence of the deepening in the lake,) the pilots...
Page 31 - ... the remainder only being in transitu for more western ports. If it be assumed that the delivery to the railways could be done at Point Levi instead of at Montreal, there would be only the Montreal goods subjected to an extra transshipment, and the additional cost of railway — over water-borne — transport between Quebec and Montreal on the railway delivery. There are, however, two local considerations which affect the general question, which are of much importance- and, in my judgment, conclusive...

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