Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman

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Open Road Media, Feb 22, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 532 pages
17 Reviews
New York Times Bestseller: This life story of the quirky physicist is “a thorough and masterful portrait of one of the great minds of the century” (The New York Review of Books). Raised in Depression-era Rockaway Beach, physicist Richard Feynman was irreverent, eccentric, and childishly enthusiastic—a new kind of scientist in a field that was in its infancy. His quick mastery of quantum mechanics earned him a place at Los Alamos working on the Manhattan Project under J. Robert Oppenheimer, where the giddy young man held his own among the nation’s greatest minds. There, Feynman turned theory into practice, culminating in the Trinity test, on July 16, 1945, when the Atomic Age was born. He was only twenty-seven. And he was just getting started. In this sweeping biography, James Gleick captures the forceful personality of a great man, integrating Feynman’s work and life in a way that is accessible to laymen and fascinating for the scientists who follow in his footsteps.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dasam - LibraryThing

A remarkable book about a remarkable man. Gleick does as good a job as anyone can at 1) explaining another person and 2) explaining the physics that has gone beyond what the eye can see, the hand can feel, and the average person can comprehend. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - setnahkt - LibraryThing

In Genius, James Gleick has the same problem with Richard Feynman that Robert Kanigel had with Ramanujan in The Man Who Knew Infinity. If you are writing about a genius in literature, you can include ... Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
FAR ROCKAWAY
PRINCETON
LOS ALAMOS
The Man Comes In with His Briefcase
Chain Reactions
The Battleship and the Mosquito Boat
Diffusion
CORNELL
Shrinking the Infinities
Dyson
A HalfAssedly ThoughtOut Pictorial SemiVision Thing
Schwingers Glory
My Machines Came from Too Far Away
CALTECH
EPILOGUE

Computing by Brain
Computing by Machine
Fenced
The Last Springtime
False Hopes
Will Bide My Time
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
NOTES
A FEYNMAN BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX
ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

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About the author (2011)

Born in New York City in 1954, James Gleick is one of the nation’s preeminent science writers. Upon graduating from Harvard in 1976, he founded Metropolis, a weekly Minneapolis newspaper, and spent the next decade working at the New York Times. Gleick’s prominent works include Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman, Isaac Newton, and Chaos: Making a New Science, all of which were shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood,was published in March 2011. He lives and works in New York.

 

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