E. Pauline Johnson, Tekahionwake: Collected Poems and Selected Prose

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University of Toronto Press, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 343 pages
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E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake) was a Native advocate of part-Mohawk ancestry, an independent woman during the period of first-wave feminism, a Canadian nationalist who also advocated strengthening the link to imperial England, a popular and versatile prose writer, and one of modern Canada's best-selling poets. Johnson longed to see the publication of a complete collection of her verse, but that wish remained unfulfilled during her life. Nine decades after her death, the first complete collection of all of Pauline Johnson's known poems, many painstakingly culled from newspapers, magazines, and archives, is now available.

In response to the current recognition of Johnson's historical position as an immensely popular and influential figure of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this volume also presents a representative selection of her prose, including fiction about native-settler relations, journalism about women and recreation, and discussions of gender roles and racial stereotypes.

Edited by Carole Gerson and Veronica Strong-Boag, authors of the enthusiastically received Paddling Her Own Canoe: Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), this collection exhibits the same impeccable scholarship and is essential to a full understanding of Johnson as a major Canadian writer and cultural figure.

 

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
xi
Beginnings to 1888
3
18891898
40
As Red Men Die
68
The Skater
81
In Grey Days
94
18991913
129
Anonymous and Pseudonymous Poems
168
NOTES
289
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
329
INDEX OF FIRST LINES
339
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Carole Gerson is Professor of English at Simon Fraser University. Veronica Strong-Boag is Professor of Women's Studies and Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia.

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