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the great salvation? I will say, with inspired teachers; The wrath of God, revealed in the curse of the law, abideth on youHow shall we escape ? But, blessed be God, there is forgiveness with him, that he may be feared.

THE

CHRISTIAN'S HAPPINESS

IN

THE HEAVENLY STATE.

A

SERMON

PREACHED IN

LITTLE PRESCOT STREET, GOODMAN's FIELDS,

JUNE 18, 1786.

occasioned by

THE DEATH OF MR. S. GILL.

(NOW FIRST PUBLISHED.]

THE

CHRISTIAN's HAPPINESS

IN

THE HEAVENLY STATE.

REVELATIONS VII. 16, 17.

They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more,

neither shall the sun light on them nor any heat, For the Lamb, which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters; and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.

In this text and context we are presented with a delightful view of the real disciples of Christ, as delivered from their sufferings and sorrows, from pains and from shame; and with a view of their exaltation to honour and happiness. This I called a delightful view. It is an animated description of that felicity which awaits the followers of the Lamb. Without, however, making many preliminary remarks, I shall proceed to consider the words as containing,

A description, both negatively and positively, of the blessedness of the saints in the heavenly state. Here is, first, their negative blessedness, and it is thus described, They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat; -and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.

more.

They shall hunger no more; they shall thirst no

The hunger and the thirst here mentioned seem to denote extreme poverty, either produced by the power of persecutors, or endured in the common course of Providence. From these, says the text, they shall be delivered; they shall never be again exercised in those ways. Then it is added, neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat. The sun and the heat, in this passage, are to be understood figuratively of persecution suffered for the sake of a good conscience, and in obedience to the divine law. Our Lord, you know, in his parable of the suwer, when describing one part of the seed as falling upon stony ground, represents that seed as quickly springing up, and making a flourishing appearance for a while; but, when the sun arises with his burning heat, it withers away. In his own explanation of that part of the parable which we have in Matt. xüi. 21. he teaches us to consider the sun in the parable as expressive of persecution for the sake of the truth. The sun, in the hot eastern countries, sheds a prodigious heat; so that to be exposed to fierce persecution, is comparable to being exposed to the fiery beams of the sun at noon-day, in those very hot climates. But now, says this negative part of the blessedness described in the text, the sun shall not light on them; not strike them with its burning beams, nor with any degree of painful heat, in future. They shall be free from persecution, with all its attending distresses: they shall be delivered from the insults and frowns of men, and from all the consequences of human enmity against them. Then it follows, in more general, but admirable language, And God shah

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