The journal of Frederick Horneman's travels: from Cairo to Mourzouk, the capital of the kingdom of Fezzan, in Africa. In the years 1797-8

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W. Bulmer and Company Cleveland-Row, St. James's; : For G. and W. Nicol, booksellees [sic] to His Majesty, Pall-Mall., 1802 - Berber languages - 196 pages
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Page 53 - ... attention, as an adept in the perseverance and redundancy of salutation. Accosting an Arab of Augila, he gave him his hand, and detained him a considerable time with his civilities, when the Arab being obliged to advance with greater speed to come up again with his companions, the youth of Fezzan thought he should appear deficient in good manners if he quitted him so soon : for near half a mile he kept running by his horse, whilst all his conversation was, How dost thou fare ? Well, how art thou...
Page 88 - St. Paul's, I would quote to you these verses: . Jupiter Ammon Pauper adhuc Deus est, nullis violata per aevum Divitiis delubra tenens, morumque priorum Numen Romano templum defendit ab auro.* The examples of those good citizens of Rome, who came to untimely ends, would not have embarrassed our Stoician. He would have asked his antagonist, what pretence could be found to accuse Providence of injustice, because men who waged war were sometimes killed, or because men who mingled in civil contests...
Page 32 - Friend, (answered he,) you will never hear of danger: but this time you will pay for your temerity.' Perceiving that terror had wholly deprived him of the necessary temper and recollection, I now left him to himself...
Page xxi - I am assured that under such character, I can travel with the same surety as the natives of the country. " Many of the caravan having been at Mecca, are aware that there are numbers of good Mussulmen from various countries who speak not Arabic, and who have different usages and customs ; and thus simply attaining a knowledge of certain religious ceremonies and prayers, there is no difficulty in passing generally as a.
Page 65 - Fezzan is governed by a sultan, descendant from the family of the Shereefs. The tradition is, that the ancestors of the reigning prince, coming from western Africa, invaded and conquered Fezzan about 500 years past. The sultan reigns over his dominions with .unlimited power, but he holds them tributary to the Bashaw of Tripoly : the amount of tribute was formerly 6000 dollars, it is now reduced to 4000 ; and an officer of the bashaw comes annually to Mourzouk, to receive this sum, or its value in...
Page 51 - The country denoted by this appellation is a vast plain, interspersed with mounds or isolated hills, and spreads to the mountains rising towards Fezzan. The stones covering the surface of this plain have the appearance of being glazed, and so too every other substance, and even the rocks which occasionally rise or project from the level. Among the stones are found fragments of large petrified marine animals, but mostly shells closed up and insolidated. These shells struck or thrown forcibly on others,...
Page 46 - Elbam-Du* lillab with great devotion. He told me, that for three days past he had been without his requisite portion of water. This man (as himself told me), was above sixty years old; and this was his third voyage from Fez to Mecca, without possessing the least means of accommodation for the journey ; without preparation of food for his subsistence: nay even without water, excepting what commiseration and the esteem in which his pilgrimage was held, might procure for him, from the charity and regard...
Page 33 - ... three days, in pursuit of two men who dwelt in their midst for ten days, who had eaten 'and drank with them as friends, and whose tents were open to them all ? Thyself hast found us praying and reading the Koran; and now thou sayest we are Infidels from Cairo ; that is, one of those from whom we fly ! Dost thou not know, that it is a great sin to tell one of the faithful that he is a Pagan ?" I spoke this with an earnest and resolute tone, and many of the congregation seemed gained over by it,...
Page 116 - Nyffe and Cabi, where it is called Julbi; and runs eastward into the district of Burnu, where it takes the name of Zad, which means the great water ; in some parts of Haussa, it is called Gaora, or the great water.
Page viii - Park's discoveries, a gate is opened to every commercial nation to enter and trade from the west to the eastern extremity of Africa. The navigable parts of the rivers Gambia and Niger are not so far distant, but that great facilities of trade may thence be derived, aided by the establishment of intermediate stations and points of intercourse. A considerable traffic is carried on by the natives for ostrich feathers, drugs, ivory, and gold, even without such advantage. On due...

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