Observations on the state of historical literature, and on the society of antiquaries, and other institutions for its advancement in England; with remarks on record offices, and on the proceedings of the Record commission, addressed to the secretary of state for the Home department

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1830
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Page 150 - This board is composed of the speaker of the House of Commons, the chancellor of the exchequer, the master of the rolls, the lord chief...
Page 198 - ... own names, specifying the name, addition, profession, occupation, and chief qualifications ; the inventions, discoveries, works, writings, or other productions of the candidate for Election ; as also notifying the usual place of his habitation. " A fair copy of which paper, with the date of the day when delivered, shall be fixed up in the common meeting room of the Society at ten several ordinary meetings, before the said candidate shall be put to the ballot...
Page 198 - Society at ten several ordinary meetings, before the said candidate shall be put to the ballot : Saving and excepting, that it shall be free for every one of his Majesty's subjects, who is a Peer or the Son of a Peer of Great Britain or Ireland, and for every one of his Majesty's Privy Council of either of the said Kingdoms, and for every foreign Prince or Ambassador, to be propounded by any single person, and to be put to the ballot for Election on the same day, there being present a competent number...
Page 200 - Bland, esq., a Fellow of the Royal Society, of the Society of Antiquaries, and of the Linnsean, Horticultural, and Geological Societies.
Page 194 - There is not at this moment, within the British isles, a single philosopher, however eminent have been his services, who bears the lowest title that is given to the lowest benefactor of the nation, or to the humblest servant of the crown...
Page 205 - Almighty has chosen to make known the laws and mysteries of his works, — he who who has devoted his life, and sacrificed his health and the interests of his family, in the most profound and ennobling pursuits, — is allowed to live in poverty and obscurity, and to sink into the grave without one mark of the affection and gratitude of his country.
Page 21 - Lord Chief Justice of England, the Master of the Rolls, the Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, and the Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer.
Page 85 - This was done, and the result was the recovery of a large portion of the Inquisitions which are noted in the preceding volumes as lost, and the discovery of upwards of three thousand other important documents of the same kind, in the several reigns from King Henry the Third to James the First...
Page 100 - The collection, of which this is the first volume, includes all the records which show the constituent parts of the ancient legislative and remedial assemblies of England, beginning with the reign of Edward I., the period when they first assumed a definite organization.
Page 197 - Every person to be elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, shall be propounded and recommended at a meeting of the Society by three or more Members; who shall then deliver to one of the Secretaries a paper, signed by themselves with their own names, specifying the name, addition, profession, occupation, and chief qualifications; the inventions, discoveries, works, writings, or other productions of the candidate for Election; as also notifying the usual place of his habitation.

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