Who Were the Early Settlers of Maryland: A Paper Read Before the "Maryland Historical Society," at Its Meeting Held Thursday Evening, October 5, 1865, Volume 3, Issue 12

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Printed at the Office of the Am. Quar. Church Review, 1866 - Maryland - 18 pages
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Page 15 - I find by the return of the sherriffs and constables who have, in obedience to my orders, made the most strict inquiry in their respective districts, and the rolls returned by the collectors of the land tax shew that they are not possessed of a twelfth part of the land which is held under your lordship as proprietary of Maryland.
Page 18 - Baltimore, his heirs, and assigns ; provided always, that no interpretation be admitted thereof, by which God's holy and truly Christian religion, or the allegiance due unto us, our heirs and successors, may suffer any prejudice or diminution...
Page 14 - The Papists in this province appear to me to be not above a twelfth part of the inhabitants, but their Priests are very numerous, whereof more have been sent in this last year, than was ever known. And though the Quakers brag so much of their numbers and riches, yet they are not above a tenth part [of the population] in number.
Page 5 - ... was attacked with any disease till the festival of the nativity of our Lord. That the day might be more joyfully celebrated, the wine flowed freely, and some, who drank immoderately, about thirty in number, were seized with a fever the next day, and twelve of them not long after died, and among whom two catholics, Nicholas Fairfax and James Barefoot, caused great regret with us all.
Page 5 - ... no one was attacked with any disease till the festival of the nativity of our Lord. That the day might be more joyfully celebrated, the wine flowed freely, and some, who drank immoderately, about thirty in number, were seized with a fever the next day, and twelve of them not long after died, and among...
Page 16 - Mass., which destroyed one hundred and seventy-four dwelling houses, and as many warehouses and shops and other buildings, which, with the furniture and goods burnt, made the estimated loss to be 100,000 sterling ; $433,000.
Page 13 - County had neither teacher, nor place of worship, either of Roman Catholics or Quakers.

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