The Development of Intelligence in Children: (the Binet-Simon Scale)

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Williams & Wilkins, 1916 - Binet-Simon Test - 336 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
37
III
91
IV
182
V
274
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Page 43 - This faculty is judgment, otherwise called good sense, practical sense, initiative, the faculty of adapting one's self to circumstances. To judge well, to comprehend well, to reason well, these are the essential activities of intelligence.
Page 320 - The police found yesterday the body of a young girl cut into eighteen pieces. They believe that she killed herself. 4. Yesterday there was an accident on the railroad. But it was not serious: the number of deaths is only 48.
Page 262 - The pedagogical principle which ought to inspire the authors of programs seems to us to be the following: the instruction should always be according to the natural evolution of the child, and not precede it by a year or two. In other words the child should be taught only what he is sufficiently mature to understand; all precocious instruction is lost time, for it is not assimilated. We have cited an example of it in regard to the date, which is taught in the Maternal School, but which is not known...
Page 287 - ... happiness than we want, while on the other hand, the misfortunes it brings are less than others wish for us. It is the mediocrity of life that makes it endurable; or, still more, that keeps it from being positively unjust." It is correct if the subject gives the central thought in his own words, eg, "Life is neither good nor bad, but mediocre, because it is inferior to what we wish and not as bad as others wish for us.
Page 43 - Just at the present time we are observing a backward girl who is developing before our astonished eyes a memory very much greater than our own. We have measured that memory and we are not deceived regarding it. Nevertheless that girl presents a most beautifully classic type of imbecility. As a result of all this investigation. in the scale which we present we accord the first place to judgment: that which is of importance to us is not certain errors which the subject commits. but absurd errors. which...
Page 41 - Saltpetriere, and afterwards in the primary schools of Paris, with both normal and subnormal children. These short psychological questions have been given the name of tests. The use of tests is today very common, and there are even contemporary authors who have made a specialty of organizing new tests according to theoretical views, but who have made no effort to patiently try them out in the schools. Theirs is an amusing occupation, comparable to a person's making a colonizing expedition into Algeria,...
Page 44 - ... being a psychological phenomenon of capital importance, one would be tempted to give it a very conspicuous part in an examination of intelligence. But memory is distinct from and independent of judgment. One may have good sense and lack memory. The reverse is also common. Just at the present time we are observing a backward girl who is developing before our astonished eyes a memory very much greater than our own. We have measured that memory and we are not deceived regarding it. Nevertheless...
Page 338 - Wurtzburg, method of 148 The Following Pages Contain Advertisements of Books and Pamphlets from the Vineland Laboratory FEEBLE-MINDEDNESS: ITS CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES BY HENRY H. GODDARD, PH.D. Cloth, 8vo, 599 pp., $4.00 postpaid "A book based upon a case study of mental defectiveness carried out by the Vineland Research Laboratory. It contains a report of 327 cases investigated by field workers with conclusions drawn from them and comments on the relation of feeble-mindedness to such social problems...
Page 287 - One hears very different judgments on the value of life. Some say it is good, others say it is bad. It would be more correct to say that it is mediocre ; because on the one hand it brings us less happiness than we want, while on the other hand the misfortunes it brings are less than others wish for us. It is the mediocrity of life that makes it endurable; or, still more, that keeps it from being positively unjust.
Page 18 - In his book, he makes a separate study of the following etiological classes: 1. Genetous Idiocy. 2. Microcephalic Idiocy. 3. Hydrocephalic Idiocy. 4. Eclampsic Idiocy. 5. Epileptic Idiocy. 6. Paralytic Idiocy. 7. Traumatic Idiocy. 8. Inflammatory Idiocy (the result of Encephalitis). 9. Sclerotic Idiocy. 10. Syphilitic Idiocy. 11. Cretinism (including the Endemic and Sporadic or Myxoedematous Forms).

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