A Course of Mathematics: Containing the Principles of Plane Trigonometry, Mensuration, Navigation, and Surveying : Adapted to the Method of Instruction in the American Colleges

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Durrie and Peck, 1854 - Mathematics
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Page 47 - The circumference of every circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees ; each degree into 60 equal parts, called minutes ; and each minute into 60 equal parts, called seconds.
Page 43 - A cone is a solid figure described by the revolution of a right angled triangle about one of the sides containing the right angle, which side remains fixed.
Page 50 - The surface of a sphere is equal to the product of its diameter by the circumference of a great circle.
Page 53 - ... the square of the hypothenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides.
Page 71 - It will be sufficient to lay the edge of a rule on C, so as to be parallel to a line supposed to pass through B and D, and to mark the point of intersection G. 126. If after a field has been surveyed, and the area computed, the chain is found to be too long or too short ; the true contents may be found, upon the principle that similar figures are to each other as the squares of their homologous sides.
Page 21 - RULE. Find the area of the sector which has the same arc, and also the area of the triangle formed by the chord of the segment and the radii of the sector. Then...
Page 119 - In any plane triangle, the sum of any two sides is to their difference as the tangent of half the sum of the opposite angles is to the tangent of half their difference. By Theorem II. we have a : b : : sin. A : sin. B.
Page 29 - CUBIC MEASURE 1728 cubic inches = 1 cubic foot 27 cubic feet = 1 cubic yard...
Page 67 - GF : hence also, the sum of the eastings is equal to the sum of the westings. We therefore conclude, that when any survey is correctly made, the sum of the northings will be equal to the sum of the southings, and the sum of the eastings to the sum of the westings.
Page 14 - A circle is a plane figure contained by one line, which is called the circumference, and is such, that all straight lines drawn from a certain point within the figure to the circumference are equal to one another : 16. And this point is called the centre of the circle.

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