Creating Military Power: The Sources of Military Effectiveness

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Stanford University Press, Apr 9, 2007 - Political Science - 264 pages
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Creating Military Power examines how societies, cultures, political structures, and the global environment affect countries' military organizations. Unlike most analyses of countries' military power, which focus on material and basic resources such as the size of populations, technological and industrial base, and GNP this volume takes a more expansive view. The study's overarching argument is that states' global environments and the particularities of their cultures, social structures, and political institutions often affect how they organize and prepare for war, and ultimately impact their effectiveness in battle. The creation of military power is only partially dependent on states' basic material and human assets. Wealth, technology, and human capital certainly matter for a country's ability to create military power, but equally important are the ways a state uses those resources, and this often depends on the political and social environment in which military activity takes place.

 

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Contents

PostMeiji Japan
27
Iraq
55
Contemporary
80
Egypt
106
The Army
136
Naval
158
Fighting Alongside Allies and Partners
186
Explaining Military Outcomes
207
Conclusion
228
Index
239
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About the author (2007)

Risa A. Brooks is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University. Elizabeth A. Stanley is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and in the Department of Government at Georgetown University.

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