The Remembered Peter: In Ancient Reception and Modern Debate

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Mohr Siebeck, 2010 - Religion - 263 pages
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Although Simon Peter was evidently a central figure in both the ministry of Jesus and the mission of the earliest church, his life and thought are shrouded in historical uncertainty. Markus Bockmuehl approaches this problem through focused studies of Peter's highly diverse profile and reception in subsequent Christian sources from Rome and Syria. In Part I of this book, Bockmuehl documents the persistent presence of Peter in personal and collective memory - a phenomenon that usefully illustrates his importance as a "centrist" figure in the early church. The author goes on to examine the apostle's place in recent historical Jesus research as well as in ongoing debates concerning the so-called "New Perspective on Paul" and the problem of Peter's relationship with Paul. Part II discusses the complexity of that Petrine memory in Syria and Rome in particular, paying specific attention to Ignatius, Justin and Serapion in the East, as well as to the significance of Roman memory for the long-standing debate about the place of Peter's death. Finally, in Part III of the book Bockmuehl reconnects this investigation of the apostle's "aftermath" to more conventional historical and exegetical problems, seeking to shed light on their generative function for his subsequent prosopographical profile. In this vein the author examines Jewish meanings and implications of Peter's names, the cultural and religious significance of his origin in the newly excavated village of Bethsaida, and the puzzling Lucan theme of Peter's "conversion" as this came to feature in early Christian faith and praxis.
 

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Contents

The Intrinsic Case for Peter
5
How We Know Simon Peter
12
Living Memory and the Birth of History
18
Memory and History
29
E P Sanders
36
N T Wright
48
Conclusion
57
ReRemembering a Tense but Vital Partnership
68
Concluding Observations
130
A Name of the Hasmonean Revival
137
A Galilean Patronym
141
Cephas
148
Conclusion
156
The Social Context of Bethsaida in the Gospels
165
Assessment and Conclusion
183
Problems of Method
189

Three Named Individuals in Syria
77
Peter Paul and Simon in the PseudoClementines
94
Simon Magus
101
Conclusion
112
Grappes Kaleidoscope
118
Slam Dunk?
124
Hagiographical Allegorical Exegetical
196
Conclusion
204
Bibliography
207
Index of Ancient Sources
243
Index of Modern Authors
258
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About the author (2010)

Markus Bockmuehl, Born 1961; 1987 PhD from Cambridge; since 2007 Professor of Biblical and Early Christian Studies, University of Oxford and Fellow of Keble College.

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