The Elements of International Law: With an Account of Its Origin Sources and Historical Development

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Harper, 1908 - International law - 673 pages
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Chapter 1, Definition & history. Chapter 2. States and their essential attributes: Chapter 3. Perfect and imperfect rights. Chapter 4. National character: Chapter 5. Extradition. Chapter 6. Private international law: Chapter 7. The right of Legation: Chapter 8. Treaties and conventions: Chapter 9. The conflict of international rights: Chapter 10. War: Chapter 11. Maritime capture: Chapter 12.Neutrality: Chapter 13. Contraband of war. Chapter 14. Blockade: Chapter 15. The right of search.
 

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Page 639 - States may exercise the right to intervene for the preservation of Cuban independence, the maintenance of a government adequate for the protection of life, property, and individual liberty, and for discharging the obligations with respect to Cuba imposed by the treaty of Paris on the United States, now to be assumed and undertaken by the government of Cuba.
Page 334 - It may not be unworthy of remark that it is very unusual, even in cases of conquest, for the conqueror to do more than to displace the sovereign and assume dominion over the country. The modern usage of nations, which has become law, would be violated ; that sense of justice and of right which is acknowledged and felt by the whole civilized world would be outraged, if private property should be generally confiscated Dissenting Opinion: Shiras, Field, JJ. and private rights annulled.
Page 277 - Whereas, the abhorrent conditions which have existed for more than three years in the Island of Cuba, so near our own borders, have shocked the moral sense of the people of the United States...
Page 420 - Her Majesty's Government, in order to evince its desire of strengthening the friendly relations between the two countries and of making satisfactory provision for the future, agrees that in deciding the questions between the two countries arising out of those claims, the Arbitrators should assume that Her Majesty's Government had undertaken to act upon the principles set forth in these rules.
Page 420 - To use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, -within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace; and also to use like diligence to prevent the departure from its jurisdiction of any vessel intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such vessel having been specially adapted, in whole or in part, within such jurisdiction, to warlike use.
Page 258 - Nothing contained in this Convention shall be so construed as to require the United States of America to depart from its traditional policy of not intruding upon, interfering with, or entangling itself in the political questions of policy or internal administration of any foreign State; nor shall anything contained in the said Convention be construed to imply a relinquishment by the United States of America of its traditional attitude toward purely American questions.
Page 515 - Crimes punishable by all penal codes, such as arson, murder, maiming, assaults, highway robbery, theft, burglary, fraud, forgery, and rape, if committed by an American soldier in a hostile country against its inhabitants, are not only punishable as at home, but in all cases in which death is not inflicted the severer punishment shall be preferred.
Page 520 - ... if captured, are not entitled to the privileges of prisoners of war, but shall be treated summarily as highway robbers or pirates.
Page 382 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective — that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 344 - On such transfer of territory it has never 'been held that the relations of the inhabitants with each other undergo any change. Their relations with their former sovereign are dissolved, and new relations are created between them and the government which has acquired their territory.

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