Intelligence and the National Security Strategist: Enduring Issues and Challenges

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Roger Z. George, Robert D. Kline
Rowman & Littlefield, 2006 - Political Science - 596 pages
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Intelligence and the National Security Strategist: Enduring Issues and Challenges presents students with a useful anthology of published articles from diverse sources as well as original contributions to the study of intelligence. The collection includes classic perspectives from the history of warfare, views on the evolution of U.S. intelligence, and studies on the delicate balance between the need for information-gathering and the values of democratic societies. It also includes succinct discussions of complex issues facing the Intelligence Community, such as the challenges of technical and clandestine collection, the proliferation of open sources, the problems of deception and denial operations, and the interaction between the Intelligence Community and the military. Several timely chapters examine the role of the intelligence analyst in support of the national security policymaker. Rounding out the volume are appendices on the legislative underpinnings of our national intelligence apparatus.
 

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Contents

Clausewitz on Intelligence
3
Clausewitzs Contempt for Intelligence
11
Part IIOrigins and Future of US Intelligence
21
Origins of the Central Intelligence Agency Those Spooky Boys
23
Central Intelligence Origin and Evolution
41
The Need to Reorganize the Intelligence Community
57
Part III Intelligence and Democracy
63
Balancing Liberty and Security
65
The Challenge for the Political Analyst
303
Fixing the Problem of Analytical Mindsets Alternative Analysis
311
The Intelligence Community Case Method Program A National Intelligence Estimate on Yugoslavia
327
Building Leverage in the Long War Ensuring Intelligence Community Creativity in the Fight against Terrorism
341
Part VIIIDeception Denial and Disclosure Problems
357
Intelligence and Deception
359
Miscalculation Surprise and US Intelligence
389
How Leaks of Classified Intelligence Help us Adversaries Implications for Laws and Secrecy
399

Sharing Secrets with Lawmakers Congress as a User of Intelligence
85
Partisanship and the Decline of Intelligence Oversight
103
The Role of the Federal Bureau of Investigation in National Security
125
Part IVChallenges of Technical Collection
145
SpaceBased Surveillance Reconnaissance Satellites Are a National Security Sine Qua Non
147
Unclassified Space Eyes
153
Commercial Satellite Imagery Comes of Age
159
John How Should We Explain MASINT?
169
The Time of Troubles The US National Security Agency in the 21Si Century
181
Part VThe Art of Clandestine Collection
207
The InCulture of the DO
209
Espionage in an Age of Change Optimizing Strategic Intelligence Services for the Future
217
Economic Espionage
237
The Ten Commandments of Counterintelligence
251
A Review of the FBIs Performance in Uncovering the Espionage Activities of Aldrich Hazen Ames
259
Part VIThe OpenSource Revolution
271
OpenSource Intelligence New Myths New Realities
273
The Strategic Use of OpenSource Information
279
OpenSource Intelligence A Review Essay
285
Part VIIChallenges of Intelligence Analysis
293
Defining the Analytic Mission Facts Findings Forecasts and Fortunetelling
295
Part IXPerils of Policy Support
415
What To Do When Traditional Models Fail
417
What We Should Demand from Intelligence
425
American Presidents and Their Intelligence Communities
431
Inside the White House Situation Room
447
Part XIntelligence and the Military
457
The DCI and the Eight HundredPound Gorilla
459
Tug of War The CIAs Uneasy Relationship with the Military
479
CIA Support to Enduring Freedom
493
Working with the CIA
497
US Central Intelligence Agency Forces Covert Warriors
509
The National Security Act Excerpts
517
Executive Order 12333 United States Intelligence Activities
523
Director of Central Intelligence Directive 11
541
The USA PATRIOT Act A Sketch
553
Executive Order Strengthened Management of the Intelligence Community
559
Summary of Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004
567
Selected Readings
591
About the Contributors
593
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Terrorism Today
Christopher C. Harmon
No preview available - 2008

About the author (2006)

Roger Z. George has recently joined the Sherman Kent Center, part of the CIA University's Sherman Kent School for Intelligence Analysis. He completed a 3-year teaching assignment at the National War College, where he served as the DCI's Faculty Representative from 2001-2004. Dr. George has been a career intelligence analyst at CIA for 25 years and is a member of the Senior Analytic Service (SAS). He has also served as a Policy Planning Staff member in the Department of State from 1989-91, was the National Intelligence Officer for Europe from 1991-1995, and was the Director of the Policy and Analysis Group for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, from 1995-1997. Dr. George received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Occidental College in 1971 and his Ph.D in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in 1977. He has taught International Politics at Brandeis University, Occidental College, UC Santa Cruz and was a post-doctoral research fellow at Stanford University prior to government service. Robert D. Kline is currently working as an independent consultant after recently retiring from the U.S. Department of Defense, where he served for more than 25 years as a senior executive. He was on the faculty of the National Defense University from 2000-2003, and taught in the Department of National Security Strategy at the National War College. Prior to serving at the Department of Defense, Mr. Kline was a senior analyst at the U.S. General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress, where he also served on the staff of a Member of Congress. Mr. Kline is a native of Washington, D.C. His undergraduate work was in Political Science and History at the University of Maryland, College Park, and he holds graduate degrees from both the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University. He is also a graduate of the Federal Executive Institute.

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