Memoirs of Sir Charles Goodville and His Family: In a Series of Letters to a Friend. In Two Volumes. ...

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Daniel Browne, and J. Whiston, and B. White, 1753
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Page 275 - Irish histories." A reprint of the Dublin edition of 1633. HARWOOD (EDWARD). Biographia classica: the lives and characters of all the classic authors, the Grecian and Roman poets, historians, orators, and biographers. . . . [By EDWARD HARWOOD.] The second edition, corrected and improv'd. To which is now added, at the end of every life, a list of the best and most curious editions of each classic author. In two volumes. London, 1750. 12 (5.1x2.8) [1019] Biographia classica: the lives and characters...
Page 261 - Act, read a Letter, wrote by a French Valet de Chambre, little acquainted with English, in the drollest Manner, and with as high Marks of Comic Humour, as I ever saw executed.
Page 276 - Daemons, but were invented and fiipported by the -Craft of the Pagan Priefts. 2. That the Oracles did not ceafe at the coming of Jefus Chrift ; but fubfifted four Hundred Years after it, till the intire Abolition of Paganifm.
Page 261 - Tragi-Comic Genius continues his Progress, the Town will be much obliged to the Proprietor of that Theatre, for so judiciously distinguishing, and giving Encouragement, to such promising Merit...
Page 260 - ... a judicious Use, as indeed, of every other Feature, which seem all calculated, for the expressing, not only the Impetuosity and Fire, of Richard's Nature, but the Artifice, and Hypocrisy of it. His Action is less constrained, and awkward, than could be imagined, from a new Performer; and to me, it was manifest, great Time, and Care had been taken, to digest every minute Action, and Accent; though great Force of Genius, shewed itself, through...
Page 261 - I saw him in a pert, flashy Character, in a Play, wrote upon the Novel, called Pamela; in which, he discharged himself, with great Life, and Smartness, suitable to what, I conceive, the Author intended...
Page 262 - I purpose making as frequent Visits, to that Theatre, as my Affairs will admit; when this new Adventurer, sets off either the Tragic, or Comic Drama. The enthusiastic author concludes his letter with a defense of the stage against the virulence of its critics, who are "either Jacobites, Nonjurors, or precise, inveterate Schismaticks.
Page 259 - His Stature is low, I think, too low. for the Stage, his Voice, round, full, and manly; but not strong in Proportion; for, toward the fifth Act, he grew hoarse — though, possibly, that might be occasioned by Inexperience, and not judging the proper Modulation. He has vast Spirit in his Manner, and Countenance, which is greatly assisted, by a quick piercing...

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