Latin grammar and junior scholarship papers

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Rivingtons, 1832 - Latin language - 122 pages
 

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Page 218 - STEWART'S CORNELIUS NEPOS; with Notes, Chronological Tables, and a Vocabulary explaining every Word in the Text. 3s. AINSWORTH'S LATIN DICTIONARY. Edited by WM. DUNCAN, ECP 1070 pages.
Page 69 - But if a' nominative come between the relative and the verb, the relative will be of that case, which the verb or noun fallowing, or the preposition going before, usually govern.
Page 78 - If the substantives be of different persons, the verb plural must agree with the first person rather than the second, and with the second rather than the third ; as, Si tu et Tullia, valetis, ego et Cicero valemus, If you and TulUa are well, I and Cicero are well.
Page 218 - What has attracted our attention and deserved " our praise in this little publication, is the plan upon which it is " constructed. — Marginal notes are added to the text, admirably " calculated to help the Tyro to the full understanding of his task ; " and a chronological table completes this portion of useful " information. There are also an index of proper names, and " instructive tables which explain and apply the Roman method of reckoning by calends, nones, and ides; but the great and peculiar...
Page 61 - Any Verb may have the same Case after it as before it, when both words refer to the same thing; as, Ego sum discipulus, I am a scholar. Tu vocäris Joannes, Той are named John. ¡lia incldit regina, She walks as a queen.
Page 85 - If the last substantive have an adjective of praise or dispraise joined with it, it may be put in the genitive or ablative.
Page 67 - If no nominative come between the relative and the verb, the relative shall be the nominative to the verb ; as — Fiant pilula duodecim, qua svmenda mint ut antea.
Page 150 - The gerund in DO of the ablative case is governed by the prepositions a, ab, de, e, ex, or in ; as, POKIUL a peccando absterret, Punishment frightens from sinning.
Page 103 - Sum used instead of affe.ro (to bring) governs two datives, the one of a person, and the other of a thing ; as, Est mili/, voluptati, It is, or brings, a pleasure to me.
Page 131 - ... came from them, whose speech was acceptable. In which greatness of mind consists. From which it is understood what may be true, simple and sincere. From that part in which we place wisdom and prudence. There is a God, whose power we adore, to whom we are obedient, and by whom we are preserved. The conveniences which we use, the light which we enjoy, the breath which we draw, are given and bestowed upon us by God. Of all the things from which something is acquired, there is nothing better, nothing...

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