Ballywhinney Girl

Front Cover
Clarion Books, 2012 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
10 Reviews
Maeve is unnerved when she and her grandfather find a body in the bog in Ballywhinney,
Ireland. It turns out to be the body of a young girl who lived more than a
thousand years ago. A girl like Maeve, with fair hair, who walked the same fields and
picked the same flowers. When archeologists display the mummy at a museum, Maeve
wonders: Does the girl mind being displayed in a glass case for all to see? Or does she
miss the green meadow where she had lain for so many hundreds of years?
Two picture-book masters sensitively capture the layers of thought and feeling arising
in the face of an awe-inspiring and mysterious discovery.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jegammon - LibraryThing

Response - I think that the plot is an interesting choice - finding a 1000 year old body in the bogs of Ireland. Yet, children and adults alike are fascinated by mummies and wonder about the people that they used to be. Curricular connections - read aloud Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kmjanek - LibraryThing

Highly Recommended Maeve and her grandfather were out collecting peat for their kitchen fireplace and they uncovered a dead body. Maeve ran home to tell her mom to call the local police. The police ... Read full review

About the author (2012)

Eve Bunting was born in Ireland and came to California with her husband and three children. She is one of the most acclaimed and versatile children's book authors, with more than two hundred novels and picture books to her credit. Among her honors are many state awards, the Kerlan Award, the Golden Kite Award, the Regina Medal, the Mystery Writers of America and the Western Writers of America awards, and a PEN International Special Achievement award for her contribution to children's literature. In 2002, Ms. Bunting was chosen to be Irish-American Woman of the Year by the Irish-American Heritage Committee of New York.

Emily Arnold McCully received the CaldecottMedal for Mirette on the High Wire. The illustrator of more than 40 books for young readers, she has a lifelong interest in history and feminist issues. She divides her time between Chatham, New York, and New York City.

Bibliographic information