Hamlet's BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age

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Harper Collins, Jun 29, 2010 - Social Science - 288 pages
8 Reviews

“A brilliant and thoughtful handbook for the Internet age.” —Bob Woodward

“Incisive ... Refreshing ... Compelling.” —Publishers Weekly

A crisp, passionately argued answer to the question that everyone who’s grown dependent on digital devices is asking: Where’s the rest of my life? Hamlet’s BlackBerry challenges the widely held assumption that the more we connect through technology, the better. It’s time to strike a new balance, William Powers argues, and discover why it's also important to disconnect. Part memoir, part intellectual journey, the book draws on the technological past and great thinkers such as Shakespeare and Thoreau. “Connectedness” has been considered from an organizational and economic standpoint—from Here Comes Everybody to Wikinomics—but Powers examines it on a deep interpersonal, psychological, and emotional level. Readers of Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point and Outliers will relish Hamlet’s BlackBerry.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

I was hoping for a bit more depth from this book. Basically Powers' argument boils down to "think about how much time you're spending looking at a screen, and if you can, decrease that and spend time ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jpe9 - LibraryThing

I heard the author at the Nantucket Athenaeum on Sunday, Oct. 3, 2010. He's *not* a luddite, but a well-read and good-reasoning proponent of cultivating depth in one's inner life by disconnecting ... Read full review

Contents

In a Digital World
9
Falling Out with the Connected
37
The Trouble with Not Really
67
Plato Discovers Distance
83
Seneca on Inner Space
101
Gutenberg and the Business
121
Shakespeare on the Beauty
137
Ben Franklin on Positive
157
Thoreau on Making
175
McLuhan and the Thermostat
193
Practical Philosophies for Every Day
209
The Internet Sabbath
223
Back to the Room
235
Acknowledgments
241
Further Reading
263
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Award-winning media critic William Powers has written for the Atlantic, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and McSweeney's, among other publications. He lives on Cape Cod with his wife, the author Martha Sherrill, and their son.

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