Math into LaTeX

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Birkhäuser, 2000 - Computers - 584 pages
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Math Into LaTeX is for the mathematician, physicist, engineer, scientist, or technical typist who needs to quickly learn how to write and typeset articles and books containing mathematical formulas, and requires a thorough reference book on all aspects of LaTeX and the AMS packages (the enhancements to LaTeX by the American Mathematical Society). Key features of Math Into LaTeX:* A simple, example-based, visual approach* A quick introduction (Part I) allowing readers to type their first articles in only a few hours* Sample articles to demonstrate the basic structure of LaTeX and AMS articles* Useful appendices containing mathematical and text symbol tables and information on how to convert from older versions* A new chapter in the fourth edition, "A Visual Introduction to MikTeX," an open source implementation of TeX and LaTeX for Windows operating systems* Another new chapter describing amsrefs, a simpler method for formatting references that incorporates and replaces BibTeX data* This edition also integrates a major revision to the amsart document class, along with updated examples----- From reviews of prior editions:"...meets the needs of mathematicians publishing mathematics..."'Zentrallblatt"This book is truly unique in its focus on getting started fast yet keeping it simple. It is indispensable for the beginner and a handy reference for the experienced user."'Bulletin of the Mathematical Association of India"I came away with the impression that this book is a very helpful and useful tool for all scientists and engineers."'Reviews of Astronomical Tools

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Contents

Typing your first article
3
Typing text
67
Text environments
121
Copyright

20 other sections not shown

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About the author (2000)

George GrAtzer is a Doctor of Science at the University of Manitoba. He authored three other books on LaTex: First Steps in LaTeX and Math into LateX, which is now in its third edition and has sold more than 6000 copies. Math into LaTeX was chosen by the Mathematics Editor of Amazon.com as one of the ten best books of 2000. He has also written many articles and a few books on the subject of lattices and universal algebra. In addition, GrAtzer is the founder of the international mathematical journal, Algebra Universalis.