Words

Front Cover
Penguin, Jul 1, 2000 - Authors, French - 157 pages
18 Reviews
After his father's early death Jean-Paul Sartre was brought up at his grandfather's home in a world even then eighty years out of date. In WordsSarte recalls growing up within the confines of French provincialism in the period before the First World War; an illusion-ridden childhood made bearable by his lively imagination and passion for reading and writing. A brilliant work of self-analysis, Wordsprovides an essential background to the philosophy of one of the profoundest thinkers of the twentieth century.

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Review: The Words

User Review  - Goodreads

For a long time, I took my pen for a sword; I now know we're powerless. No matter. I write and will keep writing books; they're needed; all the same, they do serve some purpose. Culture doesn't save ... Read full review

Review: The Words

User Review  - metaphor - Goodreads

For a long time, I took my pen for a sword; I now know we're powerless. No matter. I write and will keep writing books; they're needed; all the same, they do serve some purpose. Culture doesn't save ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Jean-Paul Sartre- one of the best-known and most discussed modern French writers and thinkers - was born in Paris in 1905. His friendship with Simone de Beauvoir, whom he met while studying philosophy at the Sorbonne, stretched over fifty years, until his death in 1980. He is perhaps best remembered as the founder of French existentialism and as a man of passion, fighting for what he believed in. Among his best known works are La Nausee(1938), Les Mouches(1943), Huis clos(1944) and the trilogy Les Chemins de la liberté; published in Penguin as The Age of Reason, The Reprieveand The Iron in the Soul.

The Letters of Jean-Paul Sartre to Simone de Beauvoir 1926-1939is also published by Penguin.

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