Rapunzel

Front Cover
Holiday House, 1982 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
86 Reviews
A wicked witch catches a man taking rampion from her garden, forces him to give her his daughter, Rapunzel, and imprisons the girl in a high tower until she is rescued by a prince, in a version of a classic fairytale first published in 1982. An ALA Notable Book. Reissue.

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Review: Rapunzel

User Review  - Goodreads

Once again, Hyman has help deliver a beautifully illustrated tale. Faithful to the Grimm version. Like Rogasky's adaptation very well. Paul O. Zelinsky's "Rapunzel" is another great read to check out in case you want to study another version of this bittersweet yarn. Read full review

Review: Rapunzel

User Review  - Roxanne - Goodreads

Once again, Hyman has help deliver a beautifully illustrated tale. Faithful to the Grimm version. Like Rogasky's adaptation very well. Paul O. Zelinsky's "Rapunzel" is another great read to check out in case you want to study another version of this bittersweet yarn. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

BARBARA ROGASKY owns hundreds of books of poetry and has loved poetry for as long as she can remember. "My older sister was a born teacher, and she introduced me to poetry very early. I love it because it is the closest thing to music. Only poetry and music can describe things as they really are".

Ms. Rogasky is the author of many highly acclaimed books for young readers, including Winter Poems, illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman, which received three starred reviews, was an ALA Notable Book, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, and a Bulletin for the Center of Children's Books Blue Ribbon Book. She lives in a 175-year-old house in Thetford Hill, Vermont, amidst the spectacular fall foliage that was the inspiration for this book.

Jacob W. Grimm (1785-1863) and his brother Wilhelm K. Grimm (1786-1859) pioneered the study of German philosophy, law, mythology and folklore, but they are best known for their collection of fairy tales. These include such popular stories as Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty and The Frog Prince. Commonly referred to now as Grimm's Fairy Tales, their collection was published as Kinder-und-Hausmarchen (Children's and Household Tales, 1812-15). The brothers were born thirteen months apart in the German province of Hesse, and were inseparable from childhood. Throughout their lives they showed a marked lack of sibling rivalry. Most of their works were written together, a practice begun in childhood when they shared a desk and sustained throughout their adult lives. Since their lives and work were so collaborative, it is difficult now to differentiate between them, but of course there were differences.- Jacob, who studied for a time in Paris, was fascinated with variant spellings of older words. He articulated "Grimm's Law," the rules of which are still used today to determine correspondences between the consonants of German and languages in the Indo-European family. Jacob was bolder and more experimental than Wilhelm, and was rumored to be a lively dancer. Throughout his life, Jacob kept rigidly to schedule and could be extremely focused on work that demanded close attention to detail. He never married, but was a loving uncle to Wilhelm's children. Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are buried side by side in Berlin.

Wilhelm K. Grimm (1786-1859) and his brother Jacob W. Grimm (1785-1863) pioneered the study of German philosophy, law, mythology and folklore, but they are best known for their collection of fairy tales. These include such popular stories as Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty and The Frog Prince. Commonly referred to now as Grimm's Fairy Tales, the collection was published as Kinder-und-Hausmarchen (Children's and Household Tales, 1812-15). The brothers were born thirteen months apart in the German province of Hesse, and were inseparable from childhood. Throughout their lives they showed a marked lack of sibling rivalry. Most of their works were written together, a practice begun in childhood when they shared a desk and sustained throughout their adult lives. Since their lives and work were so collaborative, it is difficult now to differentiate between them, but of course there were differences. Wilhelm, the younger of the two, was said to have been gentle and poetic, and his brother claimed that he was a gifted public speaker. He studied at Marburg, then went to Cassel. In 1825, at the age of 39, he married Dorschen Wild, a playmate from his childhood, who accepted his close ties to his brother without question. Wilhelm enjoyed being married and was a devoted husband and father. Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm are buried side by side in Berlin.

Trina Schart Hyman was born on April 8, 1939 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She studied at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art, the Boston Museum School of Art, and Konstfackskolan, the Swedish State Art School. While living in Sweden, she got her first illustration job with Brown and Little. Her first work, Toffe and the Little Car, was published in 1961. During her lifetime, she illustrate over 150 children's books. She received numerous awards including a Horn Award for King Stork in 1973, the Caldecott Medal for Margaret Hodges's St. George and the Dragon: A Golden Legend Adapted from Edmund Spenser's 'Faerie Queen', and Caldecott honors three times for Little Red Riding Hood, A Child's Calendar, and Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins. She also wrote and illustrated her own books including How Six Found Christmas, A Little Alphabet, Little Red Riding Hood, and Self-Portrait: Trina Schart Hyman. She joined the staff of Cricket magazine for children as an artist and illustrator in 1972 and became its art director before leaving in 1979. She died from complications of breast cancer on November 19, 2004 at the age of 65.

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