The Scarecrow of Oz

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1st World Publishing, May 22, 2006 - Oz (Imaginary place) - 208 pages
Seems to me, said Cap'n Bill, as he sat beside Trot under the big acacia tree, looking out over the blue ocean, "seems to me, Trot, as how the more we know, the more we find we don't know." "I can't quite make that out, Cap'n Bill," answered the little girl in a serious voice, after a moment's thought, during which her eyes followed those of the old sailor-man across the glassy surface of the sea. "Seems to me that all we learn is jus' so much gained."
 

Selected pages

Contents

1 THE GREAT WHIRLPOOL
11
2 THE CAVERN UNDER THE SEA
17
3 THE ORK
25
4 DAYLIGHT AT LAST
40
5 THE LITTLE OLD MAN OF THE ISLAND
47
6 THE FLIGHT OF THE MIDGETS
62
7 THE BUMPY MAN
68
8 BUTTONBRIGHT IS LOST AND FOUND AGAIN
76
14 THE FROZEN HEART
129
15 TROT MEETS THE SCARECROW
140
16 PON SUMMONS THE KING TO SURRENDER
146
17 THE ORK RESCUES BUTTONBRIGHT
152
18 THE SCARECROW MEETS AN ENEMY
157
19 THE CONQUEST OF THE WITCH
163
20 QUEEN GLORIA
170
21 DOROTHY BETSY AND OZMA
180

9 THE KINGDOM OF JINXLAND
89
10 PON THE GARDENERS BOY
98
11 THE WICKED KING AND GOOGLYGOO
103
12 THE WOODENLEGGED GRASSHOPPER
112
13 GLINDA THE GOOD AND THE SCARECROW OF OZ
123
22 THE WATERFALL
186
23 THE LAND OF OZ
192
24 THE ROYAL RECEPTION
196
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About the author (2006)

Best known as the author of the Wizard of Oz series, Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in New York. When Baum was a young man, his father, who had made a fortune in oil, gave him several theaters in New York and Pennsylvania to manage. Eventually, Baum had his first taste of success as a writer when he staged The Maid of Arran, a melodrama he had written and scored. Married in 1882 to Maud Gage, whose mother was an influential suffragette, the two had four sons. Baum often entertained his children with nursery rhymes and in 1897 published a compilation titled Mother Goose in Prose, which was illustrated by Maxfield Parrish. The project was followed by three other picture books of rhymes, illustrated by William Wallace Denslow. The success of the nursery rhymes persuaded Baum to craft a novel out of one of the stories, which he titled The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Some critics have suggested that Baum modeled the character of the Wizard on himself. Other books for children followed the original Oz book, and Baum continued to produce the popular Oz books until his death in 1919. The series was so popular that after Baum's death and by special arrangement, Oz books continued to be written for the series by other authors. Glinda of Oz, the last Oz book that Baum wrote, was published in 1920.

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