A Modern Mephistopheles

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Random House Publishing Group, Aug 26, 2009 - Fiction - 240 pages
18 Reviews
This chilling tale of lust, deception and greed, first published anonymously in 1877, allowed Alcott the chance to exercise "the lurid style" she believed was her "natural ambition". A novel of psychological complexity that touches on the controversial subjects of sexuality and drug use, A Modern Mephistopheles is a penetrating and powerful study of human evil and its appalling consequences.
 

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Review: A Modern Mephistopheles

User Review  - Whitney - Goodreads

A cross between Wuthering Heights and Romeo and Juliet. I've read several other novels of Louisa May Alcott under the pseudonym AMBarnard and isn't my favorite. A bit slow until the last 25% of book. Had a satisfactory (if not sad) ending. Read full review

Review: A Modern Mephistopheles

User Review  - Phil Syphe - Goodreads

Before reading this I was expecting something as good as, and similar to, "A Long Fatal Love Chase" or some of LMA's superb thrillers; however, this novella is one of few works by Ms Alcott that I ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
ONE
TWO
THREE
FOUR
FIVE
SIX
SEVEN
ELEVEN
TWELVE
THIRTEEN
FOURTEEN
FIFTEEN
SIXTEEN
SEVENTEEN
EIGHTEEN

EIGHT
NINE
TEN
Bibliography
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

American novelist Louisa May Alcott is best known for her classic coming-of-age novel Little Women, and its sequels Little Men and Jo's Boys. The daughter of noted transcendentalist and educator Amos Bronson Alcott and Abigail May Alcott, Alcott was an active abolitionist and feminist, and the first woman registered to vote in Concord, Massachusetts. Schooled mainly by her father, Alcott and her three sisters also received lessons from such notables as Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller. Alcott penned her first book, Flower Fables, for Emerson's daughter, Ellen. Before gaining critical success for her children's fiction, Alcott wrote several passionate adult novels using the pen name A. M. Barnard, including A Long Fatal Love Chase and Punishment. Alcott's literary career spanned more than 40 years, and she wrote more than 30 books before her death in 1888.

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