A Modern Mephistopheles

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Random House Publishing Group, Aug 26, 2009 - Fiction - 240 pages
3 Reviews
Although beloved for her children’s classic Little Women, Louisa May Alcott had a passion for sensational literature that she only dared issue anonymously or under a pseudonym. Her favorite among these adult fictions, A Modern Mephistopheles was first published in 1877 and has been rediscovered and published under Alcott’s name.

This chilling tale of lust, deception, and greed beings on a midwinter night as Felix Canaris, a despairing writer about to take his own life, is saved by a knock at the door. His mysterious visitor, Jasper Helwyze, promises the poor student fame and fortune in return for his complete devotion. The embittered Helwyze then plots to corrupt his overly ambitious protégé by artfully manipulating the innocent and beautiful Gladys. When Helwyze decides that he wants Gladys for himself, Felix must defend the adoring young woman from the corrosive influence of his diabolical patron.

A novel of psychological complexity that touches on controversial subjects such as sexuality and drug use, A Modern Mephistopheles is a penetrating and powerful study of human evil and its appalling consequences.
 

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User Review  - Sovranty - LibraryThing

Despite there being only four main characters, it is difficult to assign titles like Villain and Hero. As soon as you side with one character, a piece of information is revealed that makes you ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - PhilSyphe - LibraryThing

Before reading this I was expecting something as good as, and similar to, "A Long Fatal Love Chase" or some of LMA's superb thrillers; however, this novella is one of few works by Ms Alcott that I ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
ONE
TWO
THREE
FOUR
FIVE
SIX
SEVEN
ELEVEN
TWELVE
THIRTEEN
FOURTEEN
FIFTEEN
SIXTEEN
SEVENTEEN
EIGHTEEN

EIGHT
NINE
TEN
Bibliography
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Louisa May Alcott was both an abolitionist and a feminist. She is best known for Little Women (1868), a semi-autobiographical account of her childhood years with her sisters in Concord, Massachusetts. Alcott, unlike Jo, never married “because I have fallen in love with so many pretty girls and never once the least bit with any man. She was an advocate of women’s suffrage and was the first woman to register to vote in Concord, Massachusetts.

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