The Law Magazine, Or, Quarterly Review of Jurisprudence

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Saunders and Benning, 1839 - Law
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Page 463 - An Act to indemnify such persons in the United Kingdom as have omitted to qualify themselves for offices and employments, and for extending the time limited for those purposes respectively...
Page 260 - ... a lawyer has no business with the justice or injustice of the cause which he undertakes, unless his client asks his opinion, and then he is bound to give it honestly. The justice or injustice of the cause is to be decided by the judge. Consider, sir, what is the purpose of courts of justice ? It is that every man may have his cause fairly tried by men appointed to try causes. A lawyer is not to tell what he knows to be a lie; he is not to produce what he knows to be a false deed ; but he is not...
Page 476 - An Act to defray the Charge of the Pay, Clothing, and contingent and other Expenses of the Disembodied Militia in Great Britain and Ireland ; to grant Allowances in certain Cases to Subaltern Officers, Adjutants, Paymasters, Quartermasters, Surgeons, Assistant Surgeons, Surgeons Mates, and Serjeant Majors of the Militia ; and to authorize the Employment of the Non-commissioned Officers.
Page 311 - Gray and his assigns during his natural life, without impeachment of waste; and after the determination of that estate by any means in his lifetime, to the use of the said...
Page 265 - He was bred to the law, which is, in my opinion, one of the first and noblest of human sciences, — a science which does more to quicken and invigorate the understanding than all tho other kinds of learning put together ; but it is not apt, except in persons very happily born, to open and to liberalize the mind exactly in the same proportion.
Page 385 - Could we with ink the ocean fill— Were the whole earth of parchment made,— Were every single stick a quill, And every man a scribe by trade,— To write the love of God above, Would drain the ocean dry, Nor could the scroll contain the whole, Though stretched from sky to sky.
Page 247 - Act to amend an Act of the Sixth and Seventh Years of his late Majesty King William the Fourth, for Consolidating the Laws relating to the Presentment of Public Money by Grand Juries in Ireland...
Page 476 - London, the town council of any borough for the time being subject to the act of the session of the fifth and sixth years of the reign of king William the Fourth, chapter seventy-six, intituled "An Act to provide for the regulation of municipal corporations in England and Wales...
Page 260 - a lawyer has no business with the justice or injustice of the cause which he undertakes, unless his client asks his opinion, and then he is bound to give it honestly. The justice or injustice of the cause is to be decided by the judge. Consider, sir, what is the purpose of courts of justice? It is, that every man may have his cause fairly tried, by men appointed to try causes. A lawyer is not to tell what he knows to be a lie: he is not to produce what he knows to be a...
Page 477 - Provisions of an Act to provide for the Administration of Justice in New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land, and for the more effectual Government thereof, and for other purposes relating thereto...

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