Manual of the Orthoptera of New England: Including the Locusts, Grasshoppers, Crickets, and Their Allies

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society, 1920 - Orthoptera - 354 pages
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Page 265 - In consequence, the hay crop was seriously diminished in value. So ravenous had they become that they would attack clover, eating it into shreds. Rake and pitchfork handles, made of white ash, and worn to a glossy smoothness by use, would be found nibbled over by them if left within their reach. As soon as the hay was...
Page 301 - The damage they do is not only in the products actually consumed, but in the soiling and rendering nauseous of everything with which they come in contact. They leave, wherever they occur in any numbers, a fetid, nauseous odor, well known as the "roachy...
Page 346 - I first noticed this while watching one of the little creatures close beside me ; as a cloud passed over the sun he suddenly changed his note to one with which I was already familiar, but without knowing to what insect it belonged. At the same time all the individuals around me, whose similar day song I had heard, began to respond with the night cry; the cloud passed awa\-, and the original note was resumed on all sides.
Page 244 - ... insect's environment. Earth tints, rock and sand textures, the infinitely varied browns, greens, and grays of living and dead vegetation, yellow, orange, rose, and silvery white are all represented in spots and streaks, the effect being to merge the insect indistinguishably into its background while at rest, thus shielding it in a very high degree from the observation of its foes. These colors are of great protective value at the present time, natural selection continually acting to preserve...
Page 309 - As the long-winged males are attracted by light, country houses are often badly infested with them; and where food is scarce, the wall paper is sometimes much injured for the sake of the paste beneath. What the hordes of young which dwell under the bark of logs live upon is a question as yet unsettled, but the larvae of other insects undoubtedly form a portion of their food, as in two instances I have found them feeding upon the dead grubs of a Tenebrio beetle; while living as well as decaying vegetable...
Page 323 - By the middle of August the bulk of the pests were going through their last molt, and by the end of autumn they had stripped most of the trees, showing, however, a decided preference for the black, red, and rock-chestnut oaks over the white oaks and hickories, which they affect but little till after the first-mentioned trees are stripped.
Page 324 - They settle to roost on the witch-hazel, but do not defoliate it until the other trees mentioned are pretty bare. Sumach and thorn are also little affected, while peach and apple in an adjoining orchard were untouched. Whenever they have entirely stripped the trees and shrubs they move in...
Page 291 - So far as I am aware, this is the only instance of a Public Library in one of our great towns being on what may be termed the
Page 391 - Usually most of our North American Grylli live singly or in pairs in burrows which they dig for themselves. These are used as retreats during the day time and serve as shelter from ordinary inclemencies of weather. These burrows are generally forsaken about midsummer for some sort of above-ground shelter. From this time on, until fall, they appear to be more social and live in colonies under various sorts of rubbish. Grain shocks are a favorite haunt for them, and since twine has been used for binding,...
Page 281 - Dorsum of abdomen exposed posteriorly, horny. Order DERMAPTERA, Family Forficulidae of authors, p. 283. AA. Abdomen without forceps-like appendages at end, or if so, with tarsi five-jointed. Wings, if present, folded in fan-like plaits to their base and covered more or less completely by stiffer, parchment-like wing-covers. Order ORTHOPTERA. B. Legs equal or nearly equal in size, the hind thighs not distinctly enlarged for leaping. Auditory and sound-producing organs absent. Tegmina (wing-covers)...

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