Theory and Practice of Teaching: Or, The Motives and Methods of Good School-keeping

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American Book Company, 1885 - Teaching - 422 pages
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Page 379 - By terrible things in righteousness wilt thou answer us, O God of our salvation ; who art the confidence of all the ends of the earth, and of them that are afar off upon the sea...
Page 135 - For words are wise men's counters; they do but reckon by them: but they are the money of fools, that value them by the authority of an Aristotle, a Cicero, or a Thomas, or any other doctor whatsoever, if but a man.
Page 379 - The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, they also sing.
Page 21 - To spend too much time in studies, is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation ; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humour of a scholar: they perfect nature, and are perfected by experience...
Page 157 - ... which are these ; Adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, and such like: of the which I tell you before, as I have also told you in times past, that they which do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God.
Page 158 - Let nothing be done through strife or vain-glory, but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves.
Page 147 - Sir," said I, after puzzling a long time over ' more requiring more and less requiring less' — " will you tell me why I sometimes multiply the secon'd and third terms together and divide by the first — and at other times multiply the first and second and divide by More requires more ! — Accurate and prompt recitation. the third ?" " Why, because more requires more sometimes, and sometimes it requires less — to be sure. Haven't you read the rule, my boy ?" " Yes, sir, I can repeat the rule,...
Page 379 - They also that dwell in the uttermost parts are afraid at thy tokens: thou makest the outgoings of the morning and evening to rejoice.
Page 400 - His is a progress not to be compared with anything like a march ; but it leads to a far more brilliant triumph, and to laurels more imperishable than the destroyer of his species, the scourge of the world, ever won.
Page 360 - Delightful task ! to rear the tender thought, To teach the young idea how to shoot, . To pour the fresh instruction o'er the mind, To breathe th' enlivening spirit and to fix The generous purpose in the glowing breast.

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