The Expedition to the Isle of Rhe

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Whittingham and Wilkins, 1860 - Ré, Ile de - 287 pages
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Page 62 - Buckingham's failure is that those "whom immoderate hopes do flatter, some unprosperous accident doth, for the most part undeceive. Besides, for a man to bee equally excellent in the arts of the courte and of warre hath seldom hapned in any age". The tone of his dedication to Charles is sternly paternal rather than flattering and certainly in the delicate state of courtly and national events at that time, the concluding words could scarcely have been regarded as mollifying : — I will...
Page xxvi - The Antient Religion of the Gentiles, and Caufes of their Errors Confider'd ; the Miftakes and Failures of the Heathen Priefts and Wife-Men, in their Notions of the Deity, and Matters of Divine Worihip, are Examin'd ; with regard to their being altogether deftitute of Divine Revelation, i vol.
Page 63 - ... to turn aside. The body of the text is an outstanding blend of competent historical analysis with vivid journalism. His examination of the manoeuvres at the Isle of Rh6 is lively, but his sense of the ridiculous breaks through in a most uncourtly and injudicious way:— In this most innocent kind of warre (on which about three monthes time were imployed) my Ld. D. of Buckingham had no greater ambition then that his friends would sufficiently acknoledge that goodnesse and sweetnesse of disposition...
Page xxii - Here lyeth the body of Richard Herbert, Esquire, whose monument was made at the cost of Magdalen, his wife, daughter of Sir Richard Newport, of High Ercall, in the county of Salop, Knight, deceased...
Page xxv - De veritate, prout diftinguitur a revelatione, a. verifimili, a. poflibili, a falfo. Cui operi additi funt duo alii tractatus ; primus, de caufis errorum ; alter, de religione laici.
Page xxv - The fecond edition was published 1770, and was followed by a third and fourth edition. An edition was printed at Edinburgh by Bannatyne, in 1809, and in London by Saunders and Otley, 1826.
Page 63 - ... friends would sufficiently acknoledge that goodnesse and sweetnesse of disposition which not so much as an enemy could deny, yet, least hee should be thought to trifle, while the lines of his approches were drawinge, his Cannon did so rore from all parts, that now, as yf evry Element had beene turned to a thundringe place, the French did ducke under their fortifications, neyther could any man safly so much as shew his heade. We are not surprised that his Court-hopes faded as his brother's had....
Page 63 - In this most innocent kind of warre (on which about three monthes time were imployed) my Ld. D. of Buckingham had no greater ambition then that his friends would sufficiently acknoledge that goodnesse and sweetnesse of disposition which not so much as an enemy could deny, yet, least hee should be thought to trifle, while the lines of his approches were drawinge, his Cannon did so rore from all parts, that now, as yf evry Element had beene turned to a thundringe place, the French did ducke under their...
Page 108 - This engine at firft was thought to bee of great moment for keepinge the Enemy from our Shoare. But at laft it beinge brufed and mattered with the winds and force of the waves, it came to nothinge.

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