Ride the Wind

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Aug 10, 2011 - Fiction - 608 pages
17 Reviews
In 1836, when she was nine years old, Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanche Indians. This is the story of how she grew up with them, mastered their ways, married one of their leaders, and became, in every way, a Comanche woman. It is also the story of a proud and innocent people whose lives pulsed with the very heartbeat of the land. It is the story of a way of life that is gone forever....


From the Paperback edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Olivermagnus - LibraryThing

What a great read this book turned out to be! It's the historical fiction retelling of the story of Cynthia Ann Parker, kidnapped at the age of nine by a Comanche war band who massacred her family’s ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Strawberryga - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this book. (As I get older I need to keep a notebook to follow the Indian names!) This was a very detailed book on Indian life and I just loved reading the exact details of how the ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
36
Section 3
42
Section 4
57
Section 5
95
Section 6
117
Section 7
129
Section 8
133
Section 14
305
Section 15
344
Section 16
361
Section 17
370
Section 18
378
Section 19
428
Section 20
472
Section 21
493

Section 9
144
Section 10
181
Section 11
229
Section 12
249
Section 13
256
Section 22
552
Section 23
575
Section 24
591
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Born in Baltimore, Maryland, and raised in West Palm Beach, Florida, Lucia St. Clair Robson has been a Peace Corps volunteer in Venezuela and a teacher in Brooklyn. She lived in Japan for a year and later earned her master’s degree before starting work as a public librarian in Annapolis, Maryland. She lives there now in a rustic 1920s summer community. Lucia Robson’s library experience of presenting programs to a variety of audiences trained her in the craft of storytelling. She brings to the task of research a reference librarian’s dogged persistence and an insider’s awareness of how to find obscure sources of information.

Bibliographic information