History and Present Condition of the Barbary States: Comprehending a View of Their Civil Institutions, Antiquities, Arts, Religion, Literature, Commerce, Agriculture, and Natural Productions

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Harper & Brothers, 1835 - Africa, North - 343 pages
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Page 34 - Within a long recess there lies a bay : An island shades it from the rolling sea, And forms a port secure for ships to ride; Broke by the jutting land, on either side, In double streams the briny waters glide. Betwixt two rows of rocks a sylvan scene Appears above, and groves for ever green: A grot is form'd beneath, with mossy seats, To rest the Nereids, and exclude the heats. Down thro...
Page 46 - Yet come it will, the day decreed by fates! (How my heart trembles while my tongue relates!) The day when thou, imperial Troy! must bend, And see thy warriors fall, thy glories end.
Page 357 - The Percy Anecdotes. Revised Edition. To which is added, a valuable Collection of American Anecdotes, original and selected. • 8vo.
Page 115 - He was not ignorant," says Abulpharagius, " that they are the elect of God, his best and most useful servants, whose lives are devoted to the improvement of their rational faculties. The...
Page 255 - ... dismissed. In consequence of this outrage, Commodore Keppel was sent with seven ships of war to demand satisfaction, as well as to compromise certain differences which had arisen on account of arrears claimed of the English by the Dey of Algiers. The Mussulman frankly owned that the money having been divided among the captors could not possibly be refunded.
Page 356 - Historical and Descriptive Account of British India. From the most Remote Period to the Present Time. Including a Narrative of the Early Portuguese and English Voyages, the Revolutions in the Mogul Empire, and the Origin, Progress, and Establishment of the British Power; with Illustrations of the Botany, Zoology, Climate, Geology, and Mineralogy.
Page 117 - Egypt ; much useful experience had been acquired in the practice of arts and manufactures ; but the science of chemistry owes its origin and improvement to the industry of the Saracens. They first invented and named the alembic for the purposes of distillation, analyzed the substances of the three kingdoms of nature, tried the distinction and affinities of alkalis and acids, and converted the poisonous minerals into soft and salutary medicines.

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