The Descent of man and selection in relation to sex

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D. Appleton, 1909 - Evolution - 688 pages
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User Review  - Britt84 - LibraryThing

Very interesting to read, and definitely a very important work of science, though nowadays somewhat outdated... I do very much enjoy and appreciate Darwin's writings. He is very thorough and really ... Read full review

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User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

This is a difficult book to read in some ways. The main one being that it is so dense, the amount of information, observations, and evidence presented to the reader is staggering, all of it with the ... Read full review

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Page 618 - But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her, for her hair is given her for a covering.
Page 628 - ... is more irreligious to explain the origin of man as a distinct species by descent from some lower form, through the laws of variation and natural selection, than to explain the birth of the individual through the laws of ordinary reproduction. The birth both of the species and of the individual are equally parts of that grand sequence of events, which our minds refuse to accept as the result of blind chance.
Page 145 - Looking to the distant future, I do not think that the Rev. Mr. Zincke takes an exaggerated view when he says: 'All other series of events — as that which resulted in the culture of mind in Greece, and that which resulted in the empire of Rome — only appear to have purpose and value when viewed in connection with, or rather as subsidiary to, the great stream of Anglo-Saxon emigration to the West.
Page 632 - Man scans with scrupulous care the character and pedigree of his horses, cattle, and dogs before he matches them; but when he comes to his own marriage he rarely, or never, takes any such care.
Page 158 - But we must not fall into the error of supposing that the early progenitor of the whole Simian stock, including man, was identical with, or even closely resembled, any existing ape or monkey.
Page 53 - The early male forefathers of man were, as previously stated, probably furnished with great canine teeth; but as they gradually acquired the habit of using stones, clubs, or other weapons, for fighting with their enemies or rivals, they would use their jaws and teeth less and less. In this case, the jaws, together with the teeth, would become reduced in size, as we may feel almost sure from innumerable analogous cases.
Page 621 - Now when viewed by the light of our knowledge of the whole organic world their meaning is unmistakable. The great principle of evolution stands up clear and firm, when these groups of facts are considered in connection with others, such as the mutual affinities of the members of the same group, their geographical distribution in past and present times, and their geological succession. It is incredible that all these facts should speak falsely.
Page 79 - Colqnhoun winged two ducks, which fell on the opposite side of a stream ; his retriever tried to bring over both at once, but could not succeed ; she then, though never before known to ruffle a feather, deliberately killed one, brought over the other, and returned for the dead bird.
Page 633 - The main conclusion arrived at in this work, namely, that man is descended from some lowly organised form, will, I regret to think, be highly distasteful to many.
Page 61 - I did not formerly consider sufficiently the existence of structures, which, as far as we can at present judge, are neither beneficial nor injurious ; and this I believe to be one of the greatest oversights as yet detected in my work.

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