The Elements of English Composition: Containing Practical Instructions for Writing the English Language with Perspicuity and Elegance : Designed, in the Progress of Education, to Succeed to the Study of English Grammar, and of the Latin and Greek Classics

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Jacob Johnson and Thomas L. Plowman, 1803 - English language - 238 pages
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Page 208 - The end, then, of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith makes up the highest perfection.
Page 86 - O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers; Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood ! Over thy wounds now do I prophesy...
Page 225 - Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world, and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts ; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race...
Page 100 - Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard: that went down to the skirts of his garments; As the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion: for there the Lord commanded the blessing, even life for evermore.
Page 122 - Thou hast brought a vine out of Egypt: thou hast cast out the heathen, and planted it. Thou preparedst room before it, and didst cause it to take deep root, and it filled the land. The hills were covered with the shadow of it, and the boughs thereof were like the goodly cedars. She sent out her boughs unto the sea, and her branches unto the river.
Page 48 - To this succeeded that licentiousness which entered with the restoration, and from infecting our religion and morals fell to corrupt our language ; which last was not like to be much improved by those, who at that time made up the court of King Charles the Second...
Page 47 - ... idle men, but distinguishes the faculties of the mind that are conversant about them, calling the operations of the first Wisdom, and of the other Wit, which is a Saxon word that is used to express what the Spaniards and Italians call Ingenio, and...
Page 222 - Amhara, surrounded . on every side by mountains, of which the summits overhang the middle part. The only passage by which it could be entered was a cavern that passed under a rock, of which it has long been disputed whether it was the work of nature or of human industry. The...
Page 211 - Every man is not a proper champion for truth, nor fit to take up the gauntlet in the cause of verity ; many, from the ignorance of these maxims, and an inconsiderate zeal unto truth, have too rashly charged the troops of error and remain as trophies unto the enemies of truth.
Page 124 - And now go to; I will tell you what I will do to my vineyard : I will take away the hedge thereof, and it shall be eaten up; And break down the wall thereof, and it shall be trodden down...

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