An History of Jamaica: With Observations on the Climate, Scenery, Trade, Productions, Negroes, Slave Trade, Diseases of Europeans, Customs, Manners, Snd Dispositions of the Inhabitants : to which is Added, an Illustration of the Advantages which are Likely to Result from the Abolition of the Slave Trade

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J. Cawthorn, 1807 - Jamaica - 333 pages
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Page 94 - Imbrowned the noontide bowers : thus was this place A happy rural seat of various view ; — Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm, Others, whose fruit, burnished with golden rind, Hung amiable, Hesperian fables * true, If true, here only, and of delicious taste...
Page 289 - But why should we enumerate our injuries in detail ? By one statute it is declared that Parliament can "of right make laws to bind us in all cases whatsoever." What is to defend us against so enormous, so unlimited a power ? Not a single man of those who assume it is chosen by us, or is subject to our...
Page 293 - With an humble confidence in the mercies of the supreme and impartial Judge and Ruler of the Universe, we most devoutly implore His divine goodness to protect us happily through this great conflict, to dispose our adversaries to reconciliation on reasonable terms, and thereby to relieve the Empire from the calamities of civil war.
Page 290 - ... colonies ; and therefore they besought his majesty that he would take the most effectual measures to enforce due obedience to the laws and authority of the supreme Legislature.
Page 287 - ... men, who exercise their reason to believe, that the Divine Author of our existence intended a part of the human race to hold an absolute property in, and an unbounded power over, others, marked out by his infinite goodness and wisdom, as the objects of a legal domination, never rightfully...
Page 93 - So on he fares, and to the border comes Of Eden, where delicious Paradise, Now nearer, crowns with her inclosure green, As with a rural mound, the champaign head Of a steep wilderness...
Page 293 - They boast of their privileges and civilization, and yet proffer no milder conditions than servitude or death. In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birth-right...
Page 93 - Insuperable height of loftiest shade, Cedar, and pine, and fir, and branching palm, A sylvan scene; and as the ranks ascend Shade above shade, a woody theatre Of stateliest view.
Page 289 - By one statute it is declared that Parliament can " of right make laws to bind us in all cases whatsoever." What is to defend us against so enormous, so unlimited a power? Not a single man of those who assume it is chosen by us, or is subject to our control or influence ; but, on the contrary, they are all of them exempt from the operation of such laws, and an American revenue, if not diverted from the ostensible purposes for which it is raised, would actually lighten their own burdens in proportion...
Page 93 - Which to our general sire gave prospect large Into his nether empire neighbouring round : And higher than that wall a circling row Of goodliest trees, loaden with fairest fruit, Blossoms and fruits at once of golden hue...

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