Policing in Japan: A Study on Making Crime

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SUNY Press, 1992 - Social Science - 267 pages
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This book is an observational study of the Japanese detective, demonstrating with extensive field data the process of criminal investigation. It is the first in-depth study of the Japanese criminal justice system at work. Utilizing Ericson s concept of making crime, Setsuo Miyazawa analyzes the restraints under which Japanese detectives work, and the unique freedoms they have in the investigative process in comparison to American police generally. He also provides a comparative analysis of law enforcement in Japan, the United States, and Europe, and questions how effectively these systems evaluate and enable investigative police work."
 

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Contents

Making Crime in Japan
1
The Enabling Legal Environment
11
The Process of the Research
27
Natural Sequence of Criminal Investigation in Japan
43
Investigate Efficiency and Procedural Compliance
99
Voluntary Investigation
103
Search and Seizure
119
Arrest
127
The Forms of Detectives Involvement in Investigative Actions
171
Policy and Action of Supervisors
195
Perceptions of Internal Demands for Improved Records
207
Perceptions of External Controls and Expectations
217
Irony of Effective Supervision
233
Appendix A Survey on Duties of Officers in Criminal Investigation
245
Appendix B List of Japanese Court Cases and Relevant Statutes
251
Index
261

Detention
141
Interrogation Confession and Separate Offense
151

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About the author (1992)

Setsuo Miyazawa is Professor of Law at Aoyama Gakuin University and Senior Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law.

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