The Legacy of the Siege of Leningrad, 1941–1995: Myth, Memories, and Monuments

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 4, 2006 - History
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The siege of Leningrad constituted one of the most dramatic episodes of World War II, one that individuals and the state began to commemorate almost immediately. Official representations of 'heroic Leningrad' omitted and distorted a great deal. Nonetheless, survivors struggling to cope with painful memories often internalized, even if they did not completely accept, the state's myths, and they often found their own uses for the state's monuments. Tracing the overlap and interplay of individual memories and fifty years of Soviet mythmaking, this book contributes to understandings of both the power of Soviet identities and the delegitimizing potential of the Soviet Union's chief legitimizing myths. Because besieged Leningrad blurred the boundaries between the largely male battlefront and the predominantly female home front, it offers a unique vantage point for a study of the gendered dimensions of the war experience, urban space, individual memory, and public commemoration.
 

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User Review  - Shrike58 - LibraryThing

The basic problem with this monograph, which examines the conflicts between the expression of personal experience versus the demands of myth-making in the Soviet state, is that with a publication date ... Read full review

Contents

I
21
II
42
III
77
IV
113
V
151
VI
186
VII
231
VIII
264
IX
287
X
299
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About the author (2006)

Lisa A. Kirschenbaum is a Professor of History at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Small Comrades: Revolutionizing Childhood in Soviet Russia, 1917–1932 (2001). She is the recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities and grants from the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies of the Woodrow Wilson Center. She has published articles in the Slavic Review and Nationalities Papers, and contributed to the Women's Review of Books.

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