The Scientific and Literary Treasury: A New and Popular Encyclopedia of the Belles Lettres

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1853 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 844 pages
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Page 279 - But as a school of moral discipline, the feudal institutions were perhaps most to be valued. Society had sunk, for several centuries after the dissolution of the Roman empire, into a condition of utter depravity ; where, if any vices could be selected as more eminently characteristic than others, they were falsehood, treachery, and ingratitude.
Page 167 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the Protestant reformed religion established by the law? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them? King or queen: All this I promise to do.
Page 162 - British islands were declared to be in a state of blockade" thereby subjecting to capture and condemnation all vessels, with their cargoes, which should continue to trade with His Majesty's dominions: And whereas, by the same...
Page 432 - A fire devoureth before them, and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
Page 249 - Are they Hebrews ? So am I. Are they Israelites? So am I. Are they the seed of Abraham ? So am I.
Page 432 - The appearance of them is as the appearance of horses ; and as horsemen, so shall they run. Like the noise of chariots on the tops of mountains shall they leap, like the noise of a flame of fire that devoureth the stubble, as a strong people set in battle array. Before their face the people shall be much pained : all faces shall gather blackness.
Page 171 - The court-leet, or view of frankpledge,(x) which is a court of record, held once in the year, and not oftener,(^) within a particular hundred, lordship, or manor, before the steward of the leet: being the king's court, granted by charter to the lords of those hundreds or manors.
Page 324 - ... the violence of the wind ; which might extend the sight of the philosopher to new ranges of existence, and charm him at one time with the unbounded extent of the material creation, and at another with the endless subordination of animal life ; and, what is yet of more importance might supply the decays of nature, and succour old age with subsidiary sight.
Page 416 - Municipal law, thus understood, is properly defined to be a 'rule of civil conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state, commanding what is right and prohibiting what is wrong.
Page 279 - From these feelings, engendered from the feudal relation, has sprung up the peculiar sentiment of personal reverence and attachment towards a sovereign, which we denominate loyalty ; alike distinguishable from the stupid devotion of eastern slaves, and from the abstract respect with which free citizens regard their chief magistrate.

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