An Embassy to Provence

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Century Company, 1893 - Félibrige - 132 pages
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Page 117 - Cupid! Cupid!" in every mouth, like the natural notes of some sweet melody which drops from it whether it will or no nothing but "Cupid! Cupid! prince of God and men" The fire caught and the whole city, like the heart of one man, open'd itself to Love.
Page 37 - O, for a beaker full of the warm South, Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene, With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth, That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, And with thee fade away into the forest dim...
Page 82 - ... gravel walk — and in a moment Mistral was coming toward us with outstretched hands. What a noble-looking, poet-like poet he was ! Over six feet high, broad-shouldered, straight as an arrow, elate in carriage, vigorous — with only his grey hair, and his nearly white mustache and imperial, to certify to his fifty years. In one respect his photographic portraits do him injustice. His face is haughty in repose, and this expression is emphasized by his commanding presence and resolute air. But...
Page 6 - The comity of nations has been defined as "that courteous and friendly understanding by which each nation respects the laws and usages of every other so far as may be without prejudice to its own rights and interests.
Page 83 - ... genuine hospitality is theirs ! Never did a poet have a better work-room than this library. Overlooking the garden are two wide, high windows, close beside one of which is a writing-table of liberal size ; prints hang upon the walls ; the side opposite to the windows is filled with a tall case of books. The collection of books is not a large one (not more than a thousand volumes), but it is very rich. For four months I had been making my own little collection on the same lines, and my evil heart...
Page 84 - ... to its place he held it for a moment affectionately in his hand. In the same earnest strain in which Roumanille had spoken, he spoke of the strong motives underlying the literary movement in Provence. There was much more in it, he said, than the desire to revive a beautiful language that had fallen into undeserved neglect. The soul of it was the firm purpose to array against centralization the love of locality, of home. "If our movement...
Page 41 - But we had read no farther than " Lou Papo d'Avignoun " and "Lou baroun de Magalouno" when our minds were made up that here was a singer of ballads whose tongue was tipped with fire. They whirled upon us, these ballads, and conquered our admiration at a blow. We knew by instinct — what time and greater knowledge have shown to be the truth — that of all the Provencal poets whom we soon were to encounter none would set our heartstrings more keenly a-thrilling than did this fiery ballad-maker, Monsieur...
Page 115 - Remy : the raising of flo wersand the sale of their seed. All around the town are fields of flowers; and the flowers are suffered to grow to full maturity, and then to die their own sweet death, to the end that their seed may be garnered and sold abroad. Everywhere delicate odors floated about us in the air; and, although our coming was in August, bright colors still mingled everywhere with the green of leaves and grass. Insensibly, their gracious manner of earning a livelihood has reacted upon the...
Page 84 - Provence, it might be regarded without injustice as a last gleam of a dying glory, as the last effort of a nationality about to expire. But it is not so restricted. Languedoc, Dauphiny, Gascony, Brittany are with us. And our revival extends beyond the borders of France. In Catalonia, Aragon, Valencia, Majorca ; in Italy, Hungary, Roumania, Bohemia, Flanders, even in Iceland, there is a revival of the ancient tongues. All this is not the work of chance, nor the result of the effort of a single group...
Page 84 - We have urged our brethren of the other ancient tongues to do what we have tried to do for ourselves — to add to their own store of literary treasure, to maintain their own customs, to preserve their own traditions ; and yet, while thus holding fast to their own individuality, to cherish as their...

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