Domestic Manners of the Americans

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Penguin Books Limited, 1997 - History - 364 pages
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"I am convinced there is no writer who has so well and accurately (I need not add, so entertainingly) described [America] ... as you have done"?Dickens to Fanny Trollope, 1842

When Fanny Trollope set sail for America in 1827, she took with her three of her children and a young French artist. She left behind her son Anthony, growing debts and a husband going slowly mad from mercury poisoning. But her hopes of joining a Utopian community of emancipated slaves were soon dashed, and she and her children were forced to live by their wits in Cincinnati, then a booming frontier town on the Ohio River. What followed was a tragicomedy of illness, scandal and failed business ventures that left them destitute.

Nevertheless, on her return to England, Fanny turned her misfortunes into a remarkable book. Domestic Manners was a sensation on both sides of the Atlantic. A masterpiece of nineteenth-century travel-writing, it is also a timeless satire on a society torn between high ideals and human frailties. It remains as perceptive and funny today as it was when it was first published.

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About the author (1997)

PAMELA NEVILLE-SINGTON lives in West London. She is a member of the Trollope Society, and Viking publish her biography, Fanny Trollope: The Life and Adventures of a Clever Woman.

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