The British Essayists: To which are Prefixed Prefaces, Biographical, Historical, and Critical

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J. Haddon, 1819 - English essays
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Page 158 - Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not : for of such is the kingdom of Heaven.
Page 98 - ... to ask, and so all goes on smoothly. When the candidate has displayed his universal knowledge of the sciences, he is to display his skill in philology. One of the masters therefore desires him to construe a passage in some Greek or Latin classic, which he does with no interruption just as he pleases and as well as he can. The statutes next require that he should translate familiar English phrases into Latin. And now is the time when the masters show their wit and jocularity. Droll questions are...
Page 243 - He is returned to us a philosopher all at once," and " Whence this supercilious look? " Now, for your part, do not have a supercilious look indeed ; but keep steadily to those things which appear best to you as one appointed by God to this station. For remember that, if you adhere to the same point, those very persons who at first ridiculed will afterwards admire you. But if you are conquered by them, you will incur a double ridicule.
Page 242 - Remember that thou art an actor in a play of such a kind as the teacher (author) may choose; if short, of a short one; if long, of a long one: if he wishes you to act the part of a poor man, see that you act the part naturally; if the part of a lame man, of a magistrate, of a private person, (do the same). For this is your duty, to act well the part that is given to you; but to select the part, belongs to another.
Page 98 - The manner of proceeding is as follows : The poor young man to be examined in the sciences often knows no more of them than his bed-maker, and the masters who examine are sometimes equally unacquainted with such mysteries. But schemes, as they are called, or little books containing forty or fifty questions on each science, are handed down from age to age, from one to another. The candidate to be examined employs three or four days in learning these by heart, and the examiners, having done the same...
Page 98 - But schemes, as they are called, or little books, containing forty or fifty questions on each science, are handed down, from age to age, from one to another. The candidate to be examined employs three or four days in learning these by heart, and the examiners, having done the same before him when they were examined, know what questions to ask, and so all goes on smoothly. When the candidate has displayed his universal knowledge of the sciences, he is to display his skill in philology. One of the...
Page 183 - ... in all the colours of the rainbow. There is an elegance and a classical simplicity in the turf-clad heap of mould which covers the poor man's grave, though it has nothing to defend it from the insults of the proud but a bramble. The primrose that grows upon it is a better ornament, than the gilded lies on the oppressor's tombstone. " The prostitution of praise is injurious to virtue. That imaginary life after death, which consists in a remembrance of our worth cherished in the breasts of others,...
Page 100 - Lent, he must do quodlibets, he must do austins, he must declaim twice, he must read six solemn lectures, and he must be again examined in the sciences, before he can be promoted to the degree of Master of Arts. 'None but the initiated can know what determining, doing quodlibets, and doing austins mean. I have not room to enter into a minute description of such contemptible minutiae.
Page 43 - EVERY day's experience evinces the justness of that representation in the scriptures, in which it is said, that " the heart is deceitful above all things ; who can know it ?" In the most trifling intercourse, where neither pleasure nor profit are in view, the propensity to deceit appears in the little promises, professions, and compliments which are mutually made, usually, without any sincerity of regard, and often with real and inveterate aversion.
Page 244 - ... which are the usual subjects; and especially not about men, as blaming them or praising them, or comparing them. If then you are able, bring over by your conversation the conversation of your associates to that which is proper; but if you should happen to be confined to the company of strangers, be silent. Let not your laughter be much, nor on many occasions, nor excessive.

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