Rational Fears: American Horror in the 1950s

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Manchester University Press, 1996 - Performing Arts - 324 pages
 

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Rational fears: American horror in the 1950s

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Horror film is an increasingly visible topic of research, as demonstrated by these two books, which attempt to balance textual analysis and historical inquiry with different degrees of success ... Read full review

Rational fears: American horror in the 1950s

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Horror film is an increasingly visible topic of research, as demonstrated by these two books, which attempt to balance textual analysis and historical inquiry with different degrees of success ... Read full review

Contents

rationalisation
7
Introduction
82
paranoid horror and
219
Conclusion
303
Index
319
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About the author (1996)

Rudolf Steiner (18611925) was born in the small village of Kraljevec, Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in Croatia), where he grew up. As a young man, he lived in Weimar and Berlin, where he became a well-published scientific, literary, and philosophical scholar, known especially for his work with Goethe's scientific writings. At the beginning of the twentieth century, he began to develop his early philosophical principles into an approach to systematic research into psychological and spiritual phenomena. Formally beginning his spiritual teaching career under the auspices of the Theosophical Society, Steiner came to use the term Anthroposophy (and spiritual science) for his philosophy, spiritual research, and findings. The influence of Steiner's multifaceted genius has led to innovative and holistic approaches in medicine, various therapies, philosophy, religious renewal, Waldorf education, education for special needs, threefold economics, biodynamic agriculture, Goethean science, architec

Mark Jancovich is Reader and Director of the Institute of Film Studies at the University of Nottingham.

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