History of the United States of America Under the Constitution, Volume 5

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Dodd, Mead, 1904 - United States
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Contents

Scotts march resumed the approach to Mexico city
53
Mexico city surrenders Scott enters the capital
60
PERIOD OF THIRTIETH CONGRESS
61
Administration losing ground State elections
69
Membership Lincoln Jefferson Davis etc
75
Whigs oppose prudently loan bill rumors of peace
81
Death of John Quincy Adams at the capitol
87
Slavery seeks preponderance plans for the new domain
95
Liberty Party and Van Buren Free Sollers at Buffalo
102
Taylors support united campaign speakers Whigs successful
108
Slavery in the District postponement of territorial division
115
The Republic at peace Folks success as a negotiator
121
CHAPTER XIX
127
Sacramento laid out growth of San Francisco
136
State constitution framed and adopted
142
New portent of freedom a free Pacific population
150
Cobb chosen Speaker of the House Presidents territorial plan
156
Calhouns last speech suggestive of disunion
163
Calhouns death Benton and Foote grand committee
169
Clays committee report compromise measures the omnibus
175
Taylor indignant his firm stand against disunion
181
Fillmore the Vice President as successor his disposition
189
Compromise measures pass the Senate in separate bills
195
Northern humiliation fugitiveslave excitement
201
Second session of Congress unimportant legislation
207
Filibustering stigmatized by the government
213
Morbid forebodings of disunion oapitol extension begun
220
Saving the Union Northern State elections Whigs divided
221
Thirtysecond Congress convenes Kossuth at the capital
229
Party preparations for the Presidential canvass candidates
235
Whig cause desperate deaths of Clay and Webster
241
Second session of Congress cabinet changes
247
Fillmores appointments apparent tranquillity of the country
253
Chinese immigration on the Pacific slope
262
Thayer and his Emigrant Aid Society free settlers in Kansas
319
Robinson and the experiment of free State settlers
326
An opposition House long speakership contest choice
332
Brookss assault upon Sumner his constituents sustain him
338
The two branches deadlocked army appropriation bill fails
344
Buchanan chosen President Republicans encouraged
352
Civil war in Kansas Governor Geary
353
New free states in embryo slaverys equipoise broken
359
CHAPTER XXII
367
Buchanan acquiesces territorial protection of slavery
377
Native Americanism dying out new party
385
A stormy debate Lecompton bill carried through the Senate
391
New Lecompton bill passes Kansas spurns the bribe
395
Atlantic cable laid a premature celebration
402
The irrepressible conflict Seward and Lincoln
410
Insolvency avoided by reissuing treasury notes postal appro
416
Presidential plans the new proslavery platform
423
Development of American traits our latest discoveries
429
Browns capture and death
437
Sectional feeling increasing scenes of violence
444
Futile attempts at legislation the Covode investigation
445
Constitutional Unionists nominate Bell and Everett
452
Wideawake clubs Douglas on the stump
460
Final session of Congress Buchanans feeble message
466
Major Anderson holds Fort Sumter failure of Commissioners
474
Thompson and Thomas retire cabinet reconstructed
481
Peace Conference instituted by Virginia its sessions at Wash
489
Lincolns generous disposition Northern commotion the per
497
Compromises with slavery discussed the Crittenden proposals
499
Washington a beleaguered city its resources and aspect
506
B Length of sessions of Congress 18471861
513
AUTHOBB FINAL NOTES
521
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Page 482 - If any one attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot.
Page 282 - Measures, is hereby declared inoperative and void : it being the true intent and meaning of this act, not to legislate slavery into any territory or state, nor to exclude it therefrom, but to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form and regulate their domestic institutions in their own way, subject only to the constitution of the United States...
Page 372 - Besides, it is a judicial question, which legitimately belongs to the Supreme Court of the United States, before whom it is now pending, and will, it is understood, be speedily and finally settled. To their decision, in common with all good citizens, I shall cheerfully submit, whatever this may be...
Page 488 - I suppose, however, this does not meet the case. You think slavery is right and ought to be extended, while we think it is wrong and ought to be restricted. That. I suppose, is the rub. It certainly is the only substantial difference between us.
Page 237 - ... until time and experience shall demonstrate the necessity of further legislation to guard against the evasion of the laws on the one hand and the abuse of their powers on the other...
Page 192 - I mean to stand upon the constitution. I need no other platform. I shall know but one country. The ends I aim at shall be my country's, my God's, and truth's.
Page 488 - Do the people of the South really entertain fears that a Republican administration would, directly or indirectly, interfere with the slaves, or with them about the slaves ? If they do, I wish to assure you, as once a friend, and still, I hope, not an enemy, that there is no cause for such fears. The South would be in no more danger in this respect than it was in the days of Washington.
Page 470 - We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, that the ordinance adopted by us in convention on the twenty-third day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, whereby the Constitution of the United States of America...
Page 82 - Representatives in 1848 on the grounds that the war had been "unnecessarily and unconstitutionally begun by the President of the United States.
Page 452 - THE CONSTITUTION OF THE COUNTRY, THE UNION OF THE STATES, AND THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS...

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