Jefferson Davis: Ex-president of the Confederate States of America, Volume 2

Front Cover
Belford Company, 1890 - Presidents - 33 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
13
III
20
IV
34
V
48
VI
65
VII
77
VIII
86
XLIV
449
XLV
452
XLVI
462
XLVII
474
XLVIII
483
XLIX
487
L
498
LI
504

IX
92
X
102
XI
114
XII
120
XIII
138
XIV
159
XV
165
XVI
178
XVII
180
XVIII
184
XIX
198
XX
211
XXI
220
XXII
222
XXIII
249
XXIV
261
XXV
268
XXVI
295
XXVII
301
XXVIII
306
XXIX
327
XXX
347
XXXI
348
XXXII
355
XXXIII
361
XXXIV
366
XXXV
369
XXXVI
377
XXXVII
384
XXXVIII
392
XXXIX
400
XL
412
XLI
425
XLII
441
XLIII
445
LII
508
LIII
524
LIV
536
LV
575
LVI
579
LVII
582
LVIII
589
LIX
598
LX
606
LXI
610
LXII
620
LXIII
631
LXIV
647
LXV
653
LXVI
659
LXVII
696
LXVIII
703
LXIX
708
LXX
720
LXXI
741
LXXII
756
LXXIII
796
LXXIV
814
LXXV
816
LXXVI
819
LXXVII
825
LXXVIII
833
LXXIX
848
LXXX
882
LXXXI
896
LXXXII
906
LXXXIII
918
LXXXIV
926
Copyright

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Page 594 - The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside.
Page 594 - Men, we have fought through the war together. I have done the best that I could for you.
Page 56 - As a necessity, not a choice, we have resorted to the remedy of separation, and henceforth our energies must be directed to the conduct of our own affairs and the perpetuity of the Confederacy which we have formed. If a just perception of mutual interest shall permit us peaceably to pursue our separate political career, my most earnest desire will have been fulfilled.
Page 69 - I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so; and I have no inclination to do so.
Page 51 - They admit that we were right and that they were wrong; that no Republican State should have sent delegates ; but they are here and cannot get away. Ohio, Indiana, and Rhode Island are caving in, and there is danger of Illinois; and now they beg us, for God's sake, to come to their rescue, and save the Republican party from rupture. I hope you will send stiff-backed men, or none.
Page 385 - The commanding general considers that no greater disgrace could befall the army, and through it, our whole people, than the perpetration of the barbarous outrages upon the...
Page 228 - Prentiss) and several brigade commanders, thousands of small arms, an immense supply of subsistence, forage, and munitions of war, and a large amount of means of transportation — all the substantial fruits of a complete victory — such indeed as rarely have followed the most successful battles ; for never was an army so well provided as that of our enemy. " ' The remnant of his army had been driven in utter disorder to the immediate vicinity of Pittsburg, under the shelter of the heavy guns of...
Page 385 - The commanding general has observed with marked satisfaction the conduct of the troops on the march, and confidently anticipates results commensurate with the high spirit they have manifested. No troops could have displayed greater fortitude or better performed the arduous marches of the past ten days. Their conduct in other respects has, with few exceptions, been in keeping with their character as soldiers and entitles them to approbation and praise. "There have...
Page 30 - ... would be detrimental to manufacturing and commercial interests abroad. Should reason guide the action of the government from which we have separated, a policy so detrimental to the civilized world, the Northern States included, could not be dictated by even...
Page 14 - But Congress may, by law, grant to the principal officer in each of the Executive Departments a seat upon the floor of either House, with the privilege of discussing any measures appertaining to his department.

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