The Message of Philo Judaeus of Alexandria

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Luzac, 1909 - Jewish philosophy - 96 pages
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Page 67 - God, by whom the womb of the soul is at times opened and at times closed up; and sometimes when I have come to my work empty I have suddenly become full, ideas being, in an invisible manner, showered upon me, and implanted in me from on high; so that, through the influence of divine inspiration, I have become greatly excited, and have known neither the place in which I was nor those who were present, nor myself, nor what I was saying, nor what I was writing; for then I have been conscious of a richness...
Page 12 - Sometimes, when I have come to my work empty, I have suddenly become full; ideas being in an invisible manner showered upon me, and implanted in me from on high; so that through the influence of divine inspiration, I have become greatly excited, and have known neither the place in which I was, nor those who were present, nor myself, nor what I was saying, nor what I was writing; for then I have been conscious of a richness of interpretation, an enjoyment of light, a most penetrating insight, a most...
Page 82 - For it was indispensable that the man who was consecrated to the Father of the world, should have as a paraclete, his son, the being most perfect in all virtue, to procure forgiveness of sins, and a supply of unlimited blessings...
Page 80 - XLI. Why then do we any longer wonder, if God at times assumes the likeness of the angels, as he sometimes assumes even that of men, for the sake of assisting those who address their entreaties to him ? so that when he says, " I am the God who was seen by thee in the place of God ;"J we must understand this, that he on that occasion took the place of an angel, as far as appearance went, without changing his own real nature, for the advantage of him who was not, as yet, able to bear the sight of the...
Page 12 - Philo deplores the necessity that drove him from his life of contemplation "never entertaining any low or grovelling thoughts nor ever wallowing in the pursuit of glory or wealth, or the delights of the body". . . into the "vast sea of the cares of public politics...
Page 65 - WE ought to look upon the universal world as the highest and truest temple of God, having for its most holy place that most sacred part of the essence of all existing things, namely, the heaven ; and for ornaments, the stars ; and for priests, the subordinate ministers of his power, namely, the angels, incorporeal...
Page 60 - God who showers down heavenly wisdom from above upon all the intellects which are properly disposed for the reception of it, and which are fond of contemplation. But those who have seen and tasted it, are exceedingly delighted with it, and understand indeed what they feel, but do not know what the cause is which has affected them ; and on this account they inquire, " What is this which is sweeter than honey and whiter than snow?
Page 83 - For even though they may be at the very extremities of the earth, acting as slaves to those enemies who have led them away in captivity, still they shall all be restored to freedom in one day, as at a given signal ; their sudden and universal change to virtue causing a panic among their masters ; for they will let them go, because they are ashamed to govern those who are better than themselves.
Page 49 - God wishing to send down from heaven to the earth an image of his divine virtue, out of his compassion for our race, that it might not be destitute of a more excellent portion, and that he might thus wash off the pollutions which defile our miserable existence, so full of all dishonour, established his church among us.
Page 16 - ... over nearly the whole world, and which have caused both to Greeks and barbarians such erroneous judgments, exhort us not to be too ready in giving our credence to what is not seen ? And what are these facts ? Surely they are the instructions which we have received from our childhood, and our national customs and ancient laws, of which it is admitted that there is not a single one which is of equal force among all people ; but it is notorious that they vary according to the different countries,...

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