Howards End

Front Cover
Penguin, 2000 - Fiction - 343 pages
In Howard's End, E.M. Forster unveils the English character as never before, exploring the underlying class warfare involving three distinct groups--a wealthy family bound by the rules of tradition and property, two independent, cultured sisters, and a young man living on the edge of poverty. The source of their conflict--Howards End, a house in the countryside which ultimately becomes a symbol of conflict within British society.
 

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User Review  - Ken-Me-Old-Mate - LibraryThing

Howards End by E.M. Forster I don't know what you would make of this if you weren't English. In some ways it would be like watching an English film with subtitles that were written by someone who ... Read full review

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User Review  - amerynth - LibraryThing

I enjoyed E.M. Forster's novel "Howards End," which is about two sisters, Margaret and Helen, who have rather romantic ideals and are surrounded by hard-knock life sort of folks. The titular Howards ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
vii
Suggestions for Further Reading
xxix
A Note on the Text
xxxi
HOWARDS END
1
Explanatory Notes
295
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879. He wrote six novels, four of which appeared before the First World War, Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908), and Howard's End (1910). An interval of fourteen years elapsed before he published A Passage to India. It won both the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Maurice, his novel on a homosexual theme, finished in 1914, was published posthumously in 1971. He also published two volumes of short stories; two collections of essays; a critical work, Aspects of the Novel; The Hill of Devi, a fascinating record of two visits Forster made to the Indian State of Dewas Senior; two biographies; two books about Alexandria (where he worked for the Red Cross in the First World War); and, with Eric Crozier, the libretto for Britten's opera Billy Budd. He died in June 1970.

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