The Black Gauntlet: A Tale of Plantation Life in South Carolina

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1860 - African Americans - 559 pages
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Contents

I
11
II
19
III
34
IV
57
V
104
VI
121
VII
132
VIII
158
XII
277
XIII
310
XIV
343
XV
364
XVI
392
XVII
427
XVIII
451
XIX
487

IX
176
X
201
XI
244
XX
536
XXI
550
XXII
560

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Page 95 - Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land : and they shall be your possession. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your children after you, to inherit them for a possession; they shall be your bondmen for ever: but over your brethren the children of Israel, ye shall not rule one over another with rigour.
Page 59 - Where all the ruddy family around Laugh at the jests or pranks that never fail, Or sigh with pity at some mournful tale ; Or press the bashful stranger to his food, And learn the luxury of doing good.
Page 34 - Honor and shame from no condition rise ; Act well your part, there all the honor lies.
Page 92 - Take but degree away, untune that string, And, hark! what discord follows; each thing meets In mere oppugnancy: the bounded waters Should lift their bosoms higher than the shores, And make a sop of all this solid globe...
Page 59 - For if there come unto your assembly a man with a gold ring in goodly apparel, and there come in also a poor man in vile raiment ; and ye have respect to him that weareth the gay clothing, and say unto him, Sit thou here in a good place, and say to the poor, Stand thou there, or Sit here under my footstool, are ye not then partial in yourselves, and are become judges of evil thoughts?
Page 347 - But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of?
Page 172 - No matter how poor I am. No matter though the prosperous of my own time will not enter my obscure dwelling. If the Sacred Writers will enter and take up their abode under my roof ; if Milton will cross my threshold to sing to me of Paradise, and...
Page 19 - I saw young Harry, with his beaver on, His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly arm'd, Rise from the ground like feather'd Mercury, And vaulted with such ease into his seat, As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds, To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus And witch the world with noble horsemanship.
Page 509 - Servants, be subject to your masters with all fear ; not only to the good and gentle, but also to the froward.
Page 256 - I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this book, If any man shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book : and if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book.

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