Lie Down in Darkness

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1992 - Fiction - 400 pages
131 Reviews
Styron's novels--such as Confessions of Nat Turner and Sophie's Choice--have established him as a writer of international stature. Here he traces the betrayals, spite and disappointed love that afflict the members of a Southern family and that culminate in the suicide of the beautiful Peyton Loftis.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
36
4 stars
41
3 stars
28
2 stars
14
1 star
12

Review: Lie Down in Darkness

User Review  - Goodreads

This book was fantastic. Styron is a wonderful writer in the Faulknerian tradition, and the prose here crackles with energy. The story is moving and tragic, reminding me almost of a Southern Gothic American Pastoral. Highly recommended. Read full review

Review: Lie Down in Darkness

User Review  - Goodreads

i refuse at my age to keep reading a book that i hate. i am now reading a john grisham book, GRAY MOUNTAIN. i have enjoyed all of john s books. Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
40
III
68
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1992)

William Clark Styron was born in Newport News, Virginia on June 11, 1925. He attended Duke University and took courses at the New School for Social Research in New York City, which started him on his writing career. He was a Marine lieutenant during World War II and while serving during the Korean War, was recalled from active duty because of faulty eyesight. After leaving the service, he helped start a magazine called the Paris Review and remained as an advisory editor. His first novel, Lie Down in Darkness, was published in 1951. His other books include The Long March and Set This House on Fire. He won several awards including the Pulitzer Prize for The Confessions of Nat Turner and the American Book Award for Sophie's Choice, which was made into a movie in 1982. His short story, A Tidewater Morning, was the basis for the movie Shadrach, which Styron wrote the screenplay for with his daughter. He also wrote several nonfiction books including The Quiet Dust and Other Writings and Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness. He died on November 1, 2006 at the age of 81.

Bibliographic information