Tropic of Cancer

Front Cover
Grove Press, 1961 - Fiction - 318 pages
37 Reviews
Now hailed as an American classic, Tropic of Cancer, Henry Miller’s masterpiece, was banned as obscene in this country for twenty-seven years after its first publication in Paris in 1934. Only a historic court ruling that changed American censorship standards, ushering in a new era of freedom and frankness in modern literature, permitted the publication of this first volume of Miller’s famed mixture of memoir and fiction, which chronicles with unapologetic gusto the bawdy adventures of a young expatriate writer, his friends, and the characters they meet in Paris in the 1930s. Tropic of Cancer is now considered, as Norman Mailer said, "one of the ten or twenty great novels of our century.”

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User Review  - Alphawoman - LibraryThing

Immediately within several pages I recognized the influence Henry Miller had on Jack Kerouac. Loopy sentences stiches together like poetry in a sense. Poetry always slightly out of grasp for me. The ... Read full review

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User Review  - elka.gimpel - LibraryThing

The first time I read this, I was 16/17. I read it for all the reasons you'd imagine someone that age would read it. I didn't believe I was allowed to have an opinion at the time because I was wise ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
22
Section 2
37
Section 3
48
Copyright

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About the author (1961)

Henry Valentine Miller was born in New York City in 1891 and raised in Brooklyn. He lived in Europe, particularly Paris, Berlin, the south of France, and Greece; in New York; and in Beverly Glen, Big Sur, and Pacific Palisades, California where he died in 1980. He is also the author, among many other works, of "Tropic of Capricorn", the "Rosy Crucifixion" trilogy ("Sexus", "Plexus", "Nexus"), and "The Air-Conditioned Nightmare".

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