Lord Byron: A Biography with a Critical Essay on His Place in Literature

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1872 - Poets, English - 516 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
30
III
66
IV
83
V
112
VI
139
VII
200
VIII
241
IX
276
X
328
XI
375

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 419 - Sorrow is knowledge : they who know the most Must mourn the deepest o'er the fatal truth, The tree of knowledge is not that of life.
Page 272 - The cemetery is an open space among the ruins, covered in winter with violets and daisies. It might make one in love with death, to think that one should be buried in so sweet a place.
Page 381 - Alike in ignorance, his reason such Whether he thinks too little or too much; Chaos of thought and passion, all confused; Still, by himself abused or disabused; Created half to rise and half to fall; Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all, Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurled, The glory, jest, and riddle of the world...
Page 202 - Hougoumont appears to want little but a better cause, and that undefinable but impressive halo which the lapse of ages throws around a celebrated spot, to vie in interest with any or all of these, except perhaps the last mentioned.
Page 45 - We were on good terms, but his brother was my intimate friend. There were always great hopes of Peel, amongst us all, masters and scholars — and he has not disappointed them. As a scholar he was greatly my superior; as a declaimer and actor, I was reckoned at least his equal...
Page 362 - Indisputably, the firm believers in the Gospel have a great advantage over all others, — for this simple reason, that, if true, they will have their reward hereafter ; and if there be no hereafter, they can be but with the infidel in his eternal sleep, having had the assistance of an exalted hope, through life, without subsequent disappointment, since (at the worst for them) " out of nothing, nothing can arise,
Page 392 - I say that Maddalo is proud, because I can find no other word to express the concentred and impatient feelings which consume him; but it is on his own hopes and affections only that he seems to trample, for in social life no human being can be more gentle, patient and unassuming than Maddalo. He is cheerful, frank and witty. His more serious conversation is a sort of intoxication; men are held by it as by a spell.
Page 126 - Whatever Sheridan has done or chosen to do has been, par excellence, always the best of its kind. He has written the best comedy (School for Scandal], the best drama...
Page 385 - I am the more confirmed in this by having lately gone over some of our classics, particularly Pope, whom I tried in this way, — I took Moore's poems and my own and some others, and went over them side by side with Pope's, and I was really astonished (I ought not to have been so) and mortified at the ineffable distance in point of sense, harmony, effect, and even Imagination, passion, and Invention, between the little Queen Anne's man, and us of the Lower Empire. Depend upon it, it is all Horace...
Page 322 - OF JANUARY, 1788. HE DIED AT MISSOLONGHI, IN WESTERN GREECE, ON THE 19TH OF APRIL, 1824, ENGAGED IN THE GLORIOUS ATTEMPT TO RESTORE THAT COUNTRY TO HER ANCIENT FREEDOM AND RENOWN. HIS SISTER, THE HONOURABLE AUGUSTA MARIA LEIGH, PLACED THIS TABLET TO HIS MEMORY.

Bibliographic information