The Dramatic Works of Wycherley, Congreve, Vanbrugh, and Farquhar: With Biographical and Critical Notices

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George Routledge and Sons, 1875 - English drama - 668 pages
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Page 239 - And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice; Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice — my own affrights me with its echoes.
Page 259 - em, and got 'em by rote. The catalogue was so large, that I was not without hopes, one day or other, to hate her heartily: to which end I so used myself to think of 'em, that at length, contrary to my design and expectation, they gave me every hour less and less disturbance; till in a few days it became habitual to me to remember 'em without being displeased. They are now grown as familiar to me as my own frailties; and in all probability in a little time longer I shall like 'em as well.
Page 256 - This reflection moved me to design some characters which should appear ridiculous not so much through a natural folly (which is incorrigible, and therefore not proper for the stage) as through an affected wit: a wit which, at the same time that it is affected, is also false.
Page 280 - I had rather bring friends together, than set 'em at distance. But Mrs Marwood and he are nearer related than ever their parents thought for.
Page 262 - Pshaw ! pshaw ! that she laughs at Petulant is plain. And for my part, but that it is almost a fashion to admire her, I should — hark'ee — to tell you a secret, but let it go no further — between friends, I shall never break my heart for her.
Page 258 - ... em everything, can refuse 'em nothing. , Q2 Fain. You are a gallant man, Mirabell; and though you may have cruelty enough not to satisfy a lady's longing, you have too much generosity not to be tender of her honour. Yet you speak with an indifference which seems to be affected, and confesses you are conscious of a negligence.
Page lxv - No purity of the marriage bed is stained — for none is supposed to have a being. No deep affections are disquieted, no holy wedlock bands are snapped asunder — for affection's depth and wedded faith are not of the growth of that soil. There is neither right nor wrong, — gratitude or its opposite, — claim or duty, — paternity or sonship.
Page 263 - Fain. To let you know I see through all your little arts.— Come, you both love him; and both have equally dissembled your aversion. Your mutual jealousies of one another have made you clash till you have both struck fire.
Page 262 - Mirabell, who is lately come to town, and is between him and the best part of his estate. Mirabell and he are at some distance, as my Lady Wishfort has been told; and you know she hates Mirabell worse than a quaker hates a parrot, or than a fishmonger hates a hard frost.
Page 284 - O Marwood, Marwood, art thou false? my friend deceive me! hast thou been a wicked accomplice with that profligate man? MRS. MAR. Have you so much ingratitude and injustice to give credit against your friend, to the aspersions of two such mercenary trulls?

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