The N.E.A. Phonetic Alphabet with a Review of the Whipple Experiments

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New Era Printing Company, 1912 - Phonetic alphabet - 91 pages
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Page 29 - Quite deliberately the present writer ventures to assert that the "reform "in Modern Language Teaching now in progress is one of the most noteworthy events in the sphere of Teaching since the Renaissance, surpassing in importance even the results of introducing Science to the school.
Page 85 - English language; a notation that we can teach to the young in school, thereby training their vocal organs and leading them to pronounce the language more accurately and more intelligently; a notation that will at the same time facilitate our learning of foreign languages and the learning of English by foreigners; a notation, finally, that will enable the educated adult to consult whatever good dictionary comes to hand and find out how the word is pronounced without referring to a special and peculiar...
Page 85 - We need, the world needs, now, without further waiting, an adequate, simple, precise, unambiguous, and generally accepted notation for the sounds of the English language; a notation that we can teach to the young in school, thereby training their vocal organs and leading them to pronounce the language more accurately and more intelligently; a notation that will at the same time facilitate our learning of foreign languages and...
Page 33 - If our present wretched system of studying modern languages is ever to be reformed, it must be on the basis of a preliminary training in general phonetics, which would at the same time lay the foundation for a thorough practical study of the pronunciation and elocution of our own language — subjects which are totally ignored in our present scheme of education.
Page 33 - Learning to read by the usual methods is at best a long and dreary task; but where phonetic texts are used it becomes short and easy. When once a child reads phonetic texts fluently, learning to read the common spelling is a mere trifle.
Page 88 - Dean of the School of Pedagogy, New York University, New York City. January 14. "Psychology as Applied to Everyday Life.
Page 30 - ... Dean Russells' word. It made opposition to the grammatic-philological method then in full vogue and broke a lance for ideas championed before by such educators as Ratichius, Comenius, and Pestalozzi. It demanded thoroughness of pronunciation, a more intensive study of reading and inductive teaching of grammar based upon the reading. Above all not the dead letter, but the spoken word was to be put into the foreground of Modern Language teaching.
Page 36 - ... the beginning; and what the child learns the first year is now found to place him more than a year in advance of his former status, for the reason that his quickened intelligence has been disciplined to seize subjects in a correct manner. With these considerations the fact will not seem strange that pupils who are taught to read phonetically make better arithmetic and grammar scholars and are more wide awake and attentive, have finer discriminations — in short, are more distinguished in those...
Page 89 - ... by the Department of Superintendence of the National Education Association of a larger share of responsibility for the problems of leadership in this field.
Page 31 - Britaunica, eleventh edition, Volume XXI, page 460, under the heading of "Phoenetics" says : "The advantage of beginning a foreign language in phonetic notation are many and obvious. In the first place, the learner who has once mastered the notation and learned to pronounce the sounds the letters stand for, is able to read off at once any text that is presented to him without doubt or hesitation, and without having to burden his memory with rules of pronunciation and spelling. Another advantage of...

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